Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I created a class and passed its object to a cuda kernel.

The kernel's code is:

__global__ void kernel(pt *p,int n)
{
int id=blockDim.x*blockIdx.x+threadIdx.x;
if(id<n)
{
    p[id]=p[id]*p[id];
}}

And it gives the following error: error: ‘int pt::a’ is private

The Question is: How can I access the private member of a class?

The program runs all right if there are no private members

class pt{
int a,b;
public:
pt(){}
pt(int x,int y)
{
    a=x;
    b=y;
}
friend ostream& operator<<(ostream &out,pt p)
{
    out<<"("<<p.a<<","<<p.b<<")\n";
    return out;
}
int get_a()
{
    return this->a;
}
int get_b()
{
    return this->b;
}
__host__ __device__ pt operator*(pt p)
{
    pt temp;
    temp.a=a*p.a;
    temp.b=b*p.b;
    return temp;
}
pt operator[](pt p)
{
    pt temp;
    temp.a=p.a;
    temp.b=p.b;
    return temp;
}
void set_a(int p)
{
    a=p;
}
void set_b(int p)
{
    b=p;
}};
share|improve this question
1  
What is the definition of pt? –  Oliver Charlesworth May 17 '11 at 8:48
    
It appears that your function is declared friend outside of the class definition. What is the definition of class pt? Unless the friend function is declared inside the class definition, it is not a friend of the class. –  harrism May 18 '11 at 3:31

3 Answers 3

Private members of a class can only be accessed by its member functions and its friends.

share|improve this answer
    
I am using a friend function –  Shweta May 17 '11 at 9:00

The whole point of private variables in C++ is that they cannot be accessed outside of the scope of the class in which they are defined, or in classes specifically declared as friends. If you want to manipulate a private variable in a CUDA kernel (or in any other code for that matter, this really isn't a CUDA specific issue), you need to write an access method inside the class to do it. In CUDA, this will mean you need to define the method as both __host__ and __device__ so it can be called from either CUDA device or parent host code.

share|improve this answer
    
Its a cuda specific problem its working in host code –  Shweta May 17 '11 at 8:57
    
Can you elaborate your answer with some example –  Shweta May 23 '11 at 4:48

There are some errors in your C++ code.

This compiles on my machine (CUDA 4.0 Mac Osx)

#include <iostream>

class pt {
    int a,b;
public:
    __host__ __device__ pt(){}
    __host__ __device__ pt(int x,int y) : a(x), b(y)
    {
    }

int get_a()
{
    return this->a;
}
int get_b()
{
    return this->b;
}

__host__ __device__ pt operator*(pt p)
{
    pt temp;
    temp.a=a*p.a;
    temp.b=b*p.b;
    return temp;
}
pt operator[](pt p)
{
    pt temp;
    temp.a=p.a;
    temp.b=p.b;
    return temp;
}
void set_a(int p)
{
    a=p;
}
void set_b(int p)
{
    b=p;
}

friend std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream &out,pt p);

};

std::ostream& operator<<( std::ostream &out,pt p)
{
    out<<"("<<p.a<<","<<p.b<<")\n";
    return out;
}

__global__ void kernel(pt *p,int n)
{
int id=blockDim.x*blockIdx.x+threadIdx.x;
if(id<n)
{
    p[id]=p[id]*p[id];
}}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.