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I have this complex question from my customer, I can't find a answer on it so now I will try to ask you guys.

The quest is the following:

I think that one rule might be: Dots which appears immediately after a number, not counted as sentences. This means that sentence present in the "8. marts"and "2.567" is not counted as word dots. In return, each word dots may be overlooked (if now a sentence ends with a number: "Vi kommer kl. 8") but it's probably after all not quite as often.

Another might be: If there is one character (a letter or number) immediately after a sentence is not a phrase sentence. That would make that we avoided counting the sentence present in the "f.eks.", "bl.a." and "cand.mag.".

I hope I can be helped here.

My code:

<script>
function word_count(field, count) {

    var wordsNumberOverSeven = 0;
    var wordsNumber = 0

    var contentText = $(\'#lix_word_count\').val();
    contentText = contentText.replace(\'?\', \'.\');
    contentText = contentText.replace(\'!\', \'.\');
    contentText = contentText.replace(\',\', \'\');
    contentText = contentText.replace(\';\', \'\');
    contentText = contentText.replace(\':\', \'\');
    contentText = contentText.replace(\'\n\', \' \').replace(/^\s+|\s+$/g,\'\').replace(/\s\s+/g,\' \');

    var matchDots = contentText.split(\'.\').length-1;
    var match = contentText.split(\' \');

    $.each(match, function(){
        if ( this.length > 0 )
            wordsNumber += 1;

        if ( this.length >= 7 )
        {
            wordsNumberOverSeven += 1;
        }

    });

    var lixMatWords = wordsNumber / matchDots;
    var lixMatLongWords = ( wordsNumberOverSeven * 100 ) / wordsNumber;

    var lixMatch = Math.round(( lixMatWords + lixMatLongWords ) *100)/100;
    var lixType = \'\';

    if ( lixMatch <= 24 )
        lixType = \'Lixen i din tekst er \'+ lixMatch +\', dvs. at teksten er meget let at læse.\';
    else if ( lixMatch <= 34 )
        lixType = \'Lixen i din tekst er \'+ lixMatch +\', dvs. at teksten er let at læse\';
    else if ( lixMatch <= 44 )
        lixType = \'Lixen i din tekst er \'+ lixMatch +\', dvs. at teksten ligger i midterområdet.\';
    else if ( lixMatch <= 54 )
        lixType = \'Lixen i din tekst er \'+ lixMatch +\', dvs. at teksten er svær at læse.\';
    else
        lixType = \'Lixen i din tekst er \'+ lixMatch +\', dvs. at teksten er meget svær at læse.\';

    /** alert(lixType +\'\nDots: \'+ matchDots +\'\nWords: \'+ wordsNumber +\'\nLangeord: \'+ wordsNumberOverSeven); **/
    alert(lixType);
}
</script>
share|improve this question
    
Please rephrase the question so that it is clear what you need. Also, pick better title; no need to include "javascript" and "regex" in title as those are the tags, which is enough. –  Marko Dumic May 17 '11 at 9:23
1  
You need to restate what you are trying to match, not how your customer thinks it should be done. –  Richard H May 17 '11 at 9:31

2 Answers 2

I think we need to see the rest of the rules, or a few more at least.

Perhaps it would be better to describe what you want to include as a sentence, rather than what to exclude. If you are looking for full sentences, then it might be a period preceded by a non-whitespace character and followed by a space or new line or line feed, or some more complex rule set. It may require more than one regular expression with some other logic to sort the more complex cases.

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If you want to split sentences based on that rule, then something like

mySentences.match(/(?:[^.0-9]|[0-9]+\.?|\.[a-z0-9])+(?:\.|$)/ig)

should do it.

You'll have to expand a-z to include accented characters in your language, but that should do it.

It produces the following for your input text.

["I think that one rule might be: Dots which appears immediately after a number, not counted as sentences.",
 " This means that sentence present in the \"8. marts\"and \"2.567\" is not counted as word dots.",
 " In return, each word dots may be overlooked (if now a sentence ends with a number: \"Vi kommer kl.",
 " 8\") but it's probably after all not quite as often.",
 "\n\nAnother might be: If there is one character (a letter or number) immediately after a sentence is not a phrase sentence.",
 " That would make that we avoided counting the sentence present in the \"f.eks.",
 "\", \"bl.a.","\" and \"cand.mag.",
 "\"."]

so obviously it has trouble with dots that appear inside quoted sections. You could fix that up by walking and rejoining as long as a sentence ends inside a quoted section.

// Given mySentences defined above, walk counting quote characters.
// You could modify the regexp below if your language tends to use
// a different quoting style, e.g. French-style angle quotes.
for (var i = 0; i < mySentences.length - 1; ++i) {
  var quotes = mySentences[i].match(/["\u201c\u201d]/g);
  // If there are an odd number of quotes, combine the next sentence
  // into this one.
  if (quotes && quotes.length % 2) {
    // In English, it is common to end the quoted section after the
    // closing punctuator: Say "hello."
    var next =  mySentences[i + 1];
    if (/^["\u201c\u201d]/.test(next)) {
      mySentences[i] += next.substring(0, 1);
      mySentences[i + 1] = next.substring(1);
    } else {
      mySentences[i] += next;
      mySentences.splice(i, 1);
      --i;  // See if there's more to combine into this sentence.
    }
  }
}

This kind of stuff is pretty brittle though. If you want to know how it's done by people who specialize in this kind of thing, search for "natural language segmentation."

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