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Since Java doesnt support pointers, How is it possible to call a function by reference in Java like we do in C and C++??

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2  
Judging from the answers so far, I guess the question is ambiguous. Can you provide an example in C or C++ of what you are trying to achieve? –  Björn Pollex May 17 '11 at 9:48
    
Take the example of swapping of two numbers....as given by Stephen C....Is it possible in Java??? –  Shashi Bhushan May 17 '11 at 10:51
1  
see this previous answer of mine: stackoverflow.com/questions/3624525/… –  Sean Patrick Floyd May 17 '11 at 10:59

9 Answers 9

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Real pass-by-reference is impossible in Java. Java passes everything by value, including references. But you can simulate it with container Objects.

Use any of these as a method parameter:

  • an array
  • a Collection
  • an AtomicXYZ class

And if you change its contents in a method, the changed contents will be available to the calling context.


Oops, you apparently mean calling a method by reference. This is also not possible in Java, as methods are no first-level citizens in Java. This may change in JDK 8, but for the time being, you will have to use interfaces to work around this limitation.

public interface Foo{
    void doSomeThing();
}

public class SomeFoo implements Foo{
    public void doSomeThing(){
       System.out.println("foo");
    }
}

public class OtherFoo implements Foo{
    public void doSomeThing(){
       System.out.println("bar");
    }
}

Use Foo in your code, so you can easily substitute SomeFoo with OtherFoo.

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2  
I think you mean pass-by-reference. I think the OP is asking about call-a-method-using-a-reference-to-the-method. ;) –  Peter Lawrey May 17 '11 at 9:46
    
@Peter oops, you may be right –  Sean Patrick Floyd May 17 '11 at 9:47
    
@Duffymo you caught me, again :-) –  Sean Patrick Floyd May 17 '11 at 9:53
    
+1 for a thorough answer that covers all possible meanings of the OP's question! –  Oli Charlesworth May 17 '11 at 9:58

Usually in java this is solved by using interfaces:

Collections.sort(list, new Comparator() {

  @Override
  public int compareTo(Object o1, Object o2) {
  /// code
  }

});
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3  
Unmatched parenthesis! –  Björn Pollex May 17 '11 at 9:49
    
Thank you! =) Fixed. –  Vladimir Ivanov May 17 '11 at 9:56

How to do call by reference in Java?

You cannot do call by reference in Java. Period. Nothing even comes close. And passing a reference by value is NOT the same as call by reference.

(Real "call by reference" allows you to do this kind of thing:

void swap(ref int i, ref int j) { int tmp = *i; *i = *j; *j = tmp }

int a = 1;
int b = 2;
swap(a, b);

You simply can't do that in Java.)


Since Java doesnt support pointers ...

While this is technically true, it would not be an impediment to what you are trying to do.

Java does support references, which are like pointers in the most important respects. The difference is that you can't treat references as memory addresses by doing arithmetic on them, converting them to and from integer types and so on. And you can't create a reference to a variable because the concept does not exist in Java or the JVM architecture.


How is it possible to call a function by reference in Java like we do in C and C++??

In Java, functions (methods) and references to functions are not supported as values. So you cannot pass them as arguments, and you cannot assign them to variables.

However, you can define a class with one instance method, and use an instance of the class instead of a function reference. Other Answers give examples of this approach.

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1  
Some might also find this blog post useful: javadude.com/articles/passbyvalue.htm –  Sandman Jul 12 '11 at 12:37

The best way is to use an interface which performs the action.

// Pass a Runnable which calls the task() method
executor.submit(new Runnable() {
    public void run() {
        task();
    }
});

public void task() { }

You can use reflections to call any method

Method method = MyClass.class.getMethod("methodToCall", ParameterType.class);
result = method.invoke(object, args);
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In Java, except for primitives, passing Object to a method/function is always by reference. See Oli Charlesworth's answer for the example.

For primitive types, you can wrap it using array: For example:

public void foo(int[] in){
  in[0] = 2;
}

int[] byRef = new int[1];
byRef[0] = 1;
foo(byRef);
// ==> byRef[0] == 2.
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2  
-1 - This is false. See @Sean Patrick Floyd's answer. –  Stephen C May 17 '11 at 9:55
    
Wrapping primitive type in an array does work. See code with package jgf: –  JGFMK Sep 11 '13 at 16:56
    
A lot of ppl confuse between "call by reference" and "object references are passed by value". In Java, it is always "call by value". –  jAckOdE Dec 27 '13 at 16:38

http://www.javaworld.com/javaqa/2000-05/03-qa-0526-pass.html

Java does manipulate objects by reference, and all object variables are references. However, Java doesn't pass method arguments by reference; it passes them by value.

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2  
While true, it's important to note one very important thing: The value being passed is the object's reference. –  Andrew Barber Sep 10 '12 at 13:45
package jgf;

public class TestJavaParams {

 public static void main(String[] args) {
    int[] counter1 = new int[1];
    counter1[0] = 0;
    System.out.println(counter1[0]);
    doAdd1(counter1);
    System.out.println(counter1[0]);
    int counter2 = 0;
    System.out.println(counter2);
    doAdd2(counter2);
    System.out.println(counter2);   
  }

  public static void doAdd1(int[] counter1) {
    counter1[0] =+1;
  }

  public static void doAdd2(int counter2) {
    counter2 =+1;
  }
}

Output would be:

0
1
0
0
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Java allows only call by value. However, references to objects can be transferred to the called function using call by value. These references if used to manipulate the data of the object in the called function, this change will be visible in the calling function also. We can not do pointer arithmetic on the references as we do with pointers but references can point to the data of the object using period operator which functions as '*' operator in C/C++.

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From Java The Complete Reference by Herbert Shildt 9th edition: "When you pass an object to a method, the situation changes dramatically, because objects are passed by what is effectively call-by-reference. Keep in mind that when you create a variable of a class type, you are only creating a reference to an object. Thus, when you pass this reference to a method, the parameter that receives it will refer to the same object as that referred to by theargument. This effectively means that objects act as if they are passed to methods by use of call-by-referen ce. Changes to the object inside the method do affect the object used as an argument."

package objectpassing;

public class PassObjectTest {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Obj1 o1 = new Obj1(9);
        System.out.println(o1.getA());
        o1.setA(3);
        System.out.println(o1.getA());
        System.out.println(sendObj1(o1).getA());
        System.out.println(o1.getA());
    }

public static Obj1 sendObj1(Obj1 o)
{
    o.setA(2);
    return o;
}


}

class Obj1
{
    private int a;

    Obj1(int num)
    {
        a=num;
    }

    void setA(int setnum)
    {
        a=setnum;
    }

    int getA()
    {
        return a;
    }
}

OP: 9 3 2 2

FInal call to getA() shows original object field 'a' was changed in the call to method public static Obj1 sendObj1(Obj1 o).

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I now own about 5 books on Java. Put bluntly, most of the authors SUCK at writing books and their mastery of the Java language is questionable at best. –  Dave Black Aug 20 at 11:35

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