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I see that for using objects which are not thread safe we wrap the code with a lock like this:

private static readonly Object obj = new Object();

lock (obj)
{
    // thread unsafe code
}

So what happens when multiple threads access the same code (let's assume that it is running in a ASP.NET web application). Are they queued? If so how long will they wait?

What is the performance impact because of using locks?

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3  
yoda.arachsys.com/csharp/threads –  Cody Gray May 17 '11 at 11:02

9 Answers 9

up vote 130 down vote accepted

The lock statement is translated by C# 3.0 to the following:

var temp = obj;

Monitor.Enter(temp);

try
{
    // body
}
finally
{
    Monitor.Exit(temp);
}

In C# 4.0 this has changed and it is now generated as follows:

bool lockWasTaken = false;
var temp = obj;
try
{
    Monitor.Enter(temp, ref lockWasTaken);
    // body
}
finally
{
    if (lockWasTaken)
    {
        Monitor.Exit(temp); 
    }
}

You can find more info about what Monitor.Enter does here. To quote MSDN:

Use Enter to acquire the Monitor on the object passed as the parameter. If another thread has executed an Enter on the object but has not yet executed the corresponding Exit, the current thread will block until the other thread releases the object. It is legal for the same thread to invoke Enter more than once without it blocking; however, an equal number of Exit calls must be invoked before other threads waiting on the object will unblock.

The Monitor.Enter method will wait infinitely; it will not time out.

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14  
Note that the code emitted for the lock statement changed slightly in C#4: blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2009/03/06/… –  LukeH May 17 '11 at 11:10
1  
According to MSDN "Using the lock (C#) or SyncLock (Visual Basic) keyword is generally preferred over using the Monitor class directly, both because lock or SyncLock is more concise, and because lock or SyncLock insures that the underlying monitor is released, even if the protected code throws an exception. This is accomplished with the finally keyword, which executes its associated code block regardless of whether an exception is thrown." msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173179.aspx –  Aiden Strydom Mar 7 '14 at 21:02
    
What's the point of the var temp = obj; line. since it's just a ref to begin with, what good does making another one do? –  priehl Sep 25 '14 at 17:47
1  
@priehl It allows the user to change obj without the whole system to deadlock. –  Steven Sep 25 '14 at 20:03

No, they are not queued, they are sleeping

A lock statement of the form

lock (x) ... 

where x is an expression of a reference-type, is precisely equivalent to

var temp = x;
System.Threading.Monitor.Enter(temp); 
try { ... } 
finally { System.Threading.Monitor.Exit(temp); }

You just need to know that they are waiting to each other, and only one thread will enter to lock block, the others will wait...

Monitor is written fully in .net so it is enough fast, also look at class Monitor with reflector for more details

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3  
Note that the code emitted for the lock statement changed slightly in C#4: blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2009/03/06/… –  LukeH May 17 '11 at 11:09
    
@ArsenMkrt, they are not kept in "Blocked" state "Queue?. I think there are some difference between Sleep and block state, is not it? –  Mohanavel Jan 13 '14 at 6:56
    
what difference you mean @Mohanavel? –  Arsen Mkrtchyan Jan 13 '14 at 9:40

Locks will block other threads from executing the code contained in the lock block. The threads will have to wait until the thread inside the lock block has completed and the lock is released. This does have a negative impact on performance in a multithreaded environment. If you do need to do this you should make sure the code within the lock block can process very quickly. You should try to avoid expensive activities like accessing a database etc.

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Its more simple then you think.

According to Microsoft: The lock keyword ensures that one thread does not enter a critical section of code while another thread is in the critical section. If another thread tries to enter a locked code, it will wait, block, until the object is released.

The lock keyword calls Enter at the start of the block and Exit at the end of the block. lock keyword actually handles Monitor class at back end.

For example:

private static readonly Object obj = new Object();

lock (obj)
{
    // critical section
}

In above code first thread enters critical section then it will lock obj and when other thread tries to enter then it will also try to lock obj which is already locked by first thread, I will have to wait for first thread to release obj. and when first will leave then other thread will lock obj and will enter to critical section.

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4  
1+ for actually explaining –  MJ33 Jul 6 '14 at 15:40

The part within the lock statement can only be executed by one thread, so all other threads will wait indefinitely for it the thread holding the lock to finish. This can result in a so-called deadlock.

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The lock statement is translated to calls to the Enter and Exit methods of Monitor.

The lock statement will wait indefinitely for the locking object to be released.

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lock is actualy hidden Monitor class.

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The performance impact depends on the way you lock. You can find a good list of optimizations here: http://www.thinkingparallel.com/2007/07/31/10-ways-to-reduce-lock-contention-in-threaded-programs/

Basically you should try to lock as little as possible, since it puts your waiting code to sleep. If you have some heavy calculations or long lasting code (e.g. file upload) in a lock it results in a huge performance loss.

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Useful link. Thanks. –  NLV May 17 '11 at 11:09
    
But trying to write low-lock code can often result in subtle, hard-to-find-and-fix bugs, even if you're an expert in the field. Using a lock is often the lesser of two evils. You should lock exactly as much as you need to, no more, no less! –  LukeH May 17 '11 at 11:13
    
@LukeH: There are some usage patterns where low-lock code can be very simple and easy [do { oldValue = thing; newValue = updated(oldValue); } while (CompareExchange(ref thing, newValue, oldValue) != oldValue]. The biggest danger is that if the requirements evolve beyond what such techniques can be handle, it may be hard to adapt the code to handle that. –  supercat Nov 13 '13 at 19:45

What happens behind the scenes? Locks,DeadLocks and Syncrhonizations and IRQL

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