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I am trying to convince someone that image copy protection such as watermarks, javascript no right clicks, blank image overlays etc is not worth the effort since they are easily bypassed by even non-technical users.

I am also trying to convince them that these measures annoys customers as it impedes the user experience and does nothing to prevent image theft. At the end of the day if its on the internet, its public and people can take it if they want.

So what I'm looking for is a good study, proof, research, anything which has numbers to back up a fall in sales, user experience etc before and after these measures.

Any ideas?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could present the following:

PrtScrn - even if the right click is prevented the user can still do a print screen of the print screen and cutout the image in Paint

Retouching - even if the watermarek was on the picture it can be easly removed by any user who has read a basic photoshop/other graphic editing software tutorial on retouching photos.

But in the end I think that the best protection against theft is to actually have the image licensed and if you spot or get notified that someone used it without your premission I think you have all the arguments to go against him. You can't blame if the user saves it in his Documents folder - it same as if you hand out 1000 flyers and than sue people for having them in the drawer at home since it uses your picture.

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+1. nobody can prevent me from downloading the image, the real harm is done if i reuse it under my name, for my own profit. –  Quamis May 17 '11 at 12:15

That might not be what you wanna hear, but a full-size Watermark (not just a overlay-graphic) is a solid protection for pictures.

The rest can be easily explained:

  • The user can deactivate JavaScript
  • Overlays of all sort are worthless, the user just need to look at his cache, use a browserplugin or in new browser use the debugging tools to get the origin image
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these measures annoys customers as it impedes the user experience

No it doesn't - since when does a properly positioned transparent overlay impede the user experience?

At the end of the day if its on the internet, its public and people can take it if they want.

It's publicly viewable, but it is not theirs to just take. The images are copyright, and subject to copyright laws and international treaties.

not worth the effort since they are easily bypassed by even non-technical users.

Yes this is correct, but those measures will avoid the majority of non-savvy users saving images, it won't stop the people who really want them.

The issue is not with people saving the images, because you have implicitly given them that permission by displaying it on the net (browsers download the image to a cache and then show it). The real issue is people using images illegally, without permission, which is incredibly hard to stop. There is every reason to take reasonable steps to protect your images, if you can stop the not-so-smart users doing it, then you've saved yourself a bit of a headache. For the people who insist on re-using your images, only direct legal action will work with any surety, as threats and complaints to ISPs can be a very hit and miss affair. So if you can mess things up by using discrete but effective watermarks, and obfuscating the source of the image and intefering with the user's ability to right click and save then do it.

But having said that, it's not going to help much when Google indexes your images and displays them when a user does an image search.

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