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CREATE TABLE test2 (
id INTEGER,
name VARCHAR(10),
family VARCHAR(10),
amount INTEGER)

CREATE VIEW dbo.test2_v WITH SCHEMABINDING 
AS
SELECT id, SUM(amount) as amount
-- , COUNT_BIG(*) as tmp
FROM dbo.test2 
GROUP BY id

CREATE UNIQUE CLUSTERED INDEX vIdx ON test2_v(id)

I have error with this code:

Cannot create index on view 'test.dbo.test2_v' because its select list does not include a proper use of COUNT_BIG. Consider adding COUNT_BIG(*) to select list.

I can create view like this:

CREATE VIEW dbo.test2_v WITH SCHEMABINDING 
    AS
    SELECT id, SUM(amount) as amount, COUNT_BIG(*) as tmp
    FROM dbo.test2 
    GROUP BY id

But I'm just wondering what is purpose of this column in this case?

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Previous equivalent question: stackoverflow.com/questions/3501825/… –  Tao May 17 '11 at 11:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Demas,

You need COUNT_BIG in this case because of the fact you are using GROUP BY.

This is one of many limitations of Indexed Views and because of these restrictions, Indexed Views can't be used in many places or the usage of it is NOT as effective as it could have been. Unfortunately, it is how it works currently. Sucks, it narrows the scope of usage.

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc917715.aspx

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4  
It prevents SQL Server from having to do table scans during a delete operation. If I delete 14 rows with the same ID from a table, and that makes the SUM() expression equal 0, does that mean a) there were only 14 rows with that ID, delete it from the index, or b) There are remaining rows with this ID in the table, but their amount column SUMs to 0? If it can look at COUNT_BIG, it can answer that question immediately. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever May 17 '11 at 14:02

Looks like it's simply a hardcoded performance optimization that the SQL Server team put in place when they first designed aggregate indexed views in SQL 2000:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa902643(SQL.80).aspx

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I know this thread is a bit old but for those who still have this question, http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms191432%28v=sql.105%29.aspx says this about indexed views

The SELECT statement in the view cannot contain the following Transact-SQL syntax elements:

The AVG, MAX, MIN, STDEV, STDEVP, VAR, or VARP aggregate functions. If AVG(expression) is specified in queries referencing the indexed view, the optimizer can frequently calculate the needed result if the view select list contains SUM(expression) and COUNT_BIG(expression). For example, an indexed view SELECT list cannot contain the expression AVG(column1). If the view SELECT list contains the expressions SUM(column1) and COUNT_BIG(column1), SQL Server can calculate the average for a query that references the view and specifies AVG(column1).

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