Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

If I start a process via Java's ProcessBuilder class, I have full access to that process's standard in, standard out, and standard error streams as Java InputStreams and OutputStreams. However, I can't find a way to seamlessly connect those streams to System.in, System.out, and System.err.

It's possible to use redirectErrorStream() to get a single InputStream that contains the subprocess's standard out and standard error, and just loop through that and send it through my standard out—but I can't find a way to do that and let the user type into the process, as he or she could if I used the C system() call.

This appears to be possible in Java SE 7 when it comes out—I'm just wondering if there's a workaround now. Bonus points if the result of isatty() in the child process carries through the redirection.

share|improve this question
    
Sorry I can't help. –  jjnguy Sep 13 '08 at 4:33
    
No problem. (I wasn't the one who downvoted you, by the way.) –  John Calsbeek Sep 13 '08 at 4:35
    
Heh, well, thanks to the guy that un-down-voted me. And thank you, John for not downvoting me. –  jjnguy Sep 13 '08 at 4:37
    
Good feelings all around! –  John Calsbeek Sep 13 '08 at 4:39
    
Excellent - I was just looking for how to do this as well. yay for Stackoverflow :) –  Mark Derricutt Feb 6 '09 at 3:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 15 down vote accepted

You will need to copy the Process out, err, and input streams to the System versions. The easiest way to do that is using the IOUtils class from the Commons IO package. The copy method looks to be what you need. The copy method invocations will need to be in separate threads.

Here is the basic code:

// Assume you already have a processBuilder all configured and ready to go
final Process process = processBuilder.start();
new Thread(new Runnable() {public void run() {
  IOUtils.copy(process.getOutputStream(), System.out);
} } ).start();
new Thread(new Runnable() {public void run() {
  IOUtils.copy(process.getErrorStream(), System.err);
} } ).start();
new Thread(new Runnable() {public void run() {
  IOUtils.copy(System.in, process.getInputStream());
} } ).start();
share|improve this answer
4  
Not quite. IOUtils.copy takes InputStream as it's first argument, so that won't work with getOutputStream. So it is IOUtils.copy(process.getInputStream(), System.out); It's a bit confusing, as getOutputStream actually pipes to input of the process. –  Eelco Oct 15 '09 at 4:03
    
The structure of this looks right, but I also agree that the parameters to IOUtils seems backwords. the process.getInputStream() is what should be piped to stdout (yeah, it sounds backwards). So while the structure of this looks good, the calls to IOUtils look wrong and now have me a bit confused... –  titania424 Apr 7 '11 at 19:52

A variation on John's answer that compiles and doesn't require you to use Commons IO:

private static void pipeOutput(Process process) {
    pipe(process.getErrorStream(), System.err);
    pipe(process.getInputStream(), System.out);
}

private static void pipe(final InputStream src, final PrintStream dest) {
    new Thread(new Runnable() {
        public void run() {
            try {
                byte[] buffer = new byte[1024];
                for (int n = 0; n != -1; n = src.read(buffer)) {
                    dest.write(buffer, 0, n);
                }
            } catch (IOException e) { // just exit
            }
        }
    }).start();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Not answer the question for System.in. –  solotim Dec 18 '09 at 8:41
    
Why does pipe(System.in, process.getOutputStream()); not seem to work? –  adi92 May 27 '10 at 0:00

For System.in use the following pipein() instead of pipe()

pipein(System.in, p.getOutputStream());

Implementation:

private static void pipein(final InputStream src, final OutputStream dest) {

    new Thread(new Runnable() {
        public void run() {
            try {
               int ret = -1;
               while ((ret = System.in.read()) != -1) {
                  dest.write(ret);
                  dest.flush();
               }
            } catch (IOException e) { // just exit
            }
        }
    }).start();

}
share|improve this answer
    
This can't work. –  Grae Feb 28 '13 at 21:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.