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Whenever I try to open a .csv file with the python command fread = open('input.csv', 'r') it always opens the file with spaces between every single character. I'm guessing it's something wrong with the text file because I can open other text files with the same command and they are loaded correctly. Does anyone know why a text file would load like this in python?

Thanks.

Update

Ok, I got it with the help of Jarret Hardie's post

this is the code that I used to convert the file to ascii

fread = open('input.csv', 'rb').read()
mytext = fread.decode('utf-16')
mytext = mytext.encode('ascii', 'ignore')
fwrite = open('input-ascii.csv', 'wb')
fwrite.write(mytext)

Thanks!

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10 Answers 10

up vote 10 down vote accepted

The post by recursive is probably right... the contents of the file are likely encoded with a multi-byte charset. If this is, in fact, the case you can likely read the file in python itself without having to convert it first outside of python.

Try something like:

fread = open('input.csv', 'rb').read()
mytext = fread.decode('utf-16')

The 'b' flag ensures the file is read as binary data. You'll need to know (or guess) the original encoding... in this example, I've used utf-16, but YMMV. This will convert the file to unicode. If you truly have a file with multi-byte chars, I don't recommend converting it to ascii as you may end up losing a lot of the characters in the process.

EDIT: Thanks for uploading the file. There are two bytes at the front of the file which indicates that it does, indeed, use a wide charset. If you're curious, open the file in a hex editor as some have suggested... you'll see something in the text version like 'I.D.|.' (etc). The dot is the extra byte for each char.

The code snippet above seems to work on my machine with that file.

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The file is encoded in some unicode encoding, but you are reading it as ascii. Try to convert the file to ascii before using it in python.

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yeah, I think it's in unicode, is there a way to open the file in python, convert the file to ascii, write the file, then reopen it to load it as a csv? –  wlindner Mar 2 '09 at 17:40

Isn't csv a simple txt file with values separated with comma. Just try to open it with a text editor to see if the file is correctly formed.

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well, it is a text file and properly formated with | characters instead of commas, but the problem is actually before I ever try to read it into the csv reader. –  wlindner Mar 2 '09 at 17:29

To read an encoded file, you can simply replace open with codecs.open.

fread = codecs.open('input.csv', 'r', 'utf-16')
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First of all, use an hex-editor to view the file, see if there is anything irregular about it.

Secondly, please post the code you are using.

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I second that, please post the code :) –  Loïc Wolff Mar 2 '09 at 17:19
    
it really just is something wrong with the text file. The code is basically just that one line that I already posted. I'm seeing the hex code 00 in between every character. This must be the problem. Here's the first line of the file: drop.io/nbcacm5 –  wlindner Mar 2 '09 at 17:34

It did never ocurred to me, but as truppo said, it must be something wrong with the file.

Try to open the file in Excel/BrOffice Calc and Save As the file as Csv again.

If the problem persists, try a subset of the data: fist 10/last 10/intermediate 10 lines of the file.

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You might as well upload the file in question to a site like http://drop.io/ and give us a link.

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drop.io/nbcacm5 –  wlindner Mar 2 '09 at 17:34

Ok, I got it with the help of Jarret Hardie's post

this is the code that I used to convert the file to ascii

fread = open('input.csv', 'rb').read()
mytext = fread.decode('utf-16')
mytext = mytext.encode('ascii', 'ignore')
fwrite = open('input-ascii.csv', 'wb')
fwrite.write(mytext)

Thanks!

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Open the file in binary mode, 'rb'. Check it in a HEX Editor and check for null padding '00'. Open the file in something like Scintilla Text Editor to check the characters present in the file.

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+1 for mentioning Scintilla :) –  Corey Goldberg Mar 2 '09 at 18:44

Here's the quick and easy way, esp if python won't parse the input correctly

sed 's/ \(.\)/\1/g'
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