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How focused a project proposal is required to gain access to a Kindle Development Kit?

From Amazon's Request Access page:

Briefly describe the active content applications you intend to build on Kindle

I don't have a project spec yet, I just want to explore and experiment. I thought about putting that as my description, but I don't want to be denied because my project wasn't fleshed out enough.

What types of applications have people described that have gained them access to the KDK? Has anyone been denied access because of a "bad" proposal? About how long did it take to hear back from Amazon?

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kdk.amazon.com/gp/vendor/kindlepubs/kdk/request-seat is not working. Do anyone know why? –  zeiteisen Jan 14 at 7:46
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5 Answers

My proposal was something like "I want to make a Reddit app which could do x, y, and z, or maybe something for note-taking." Not much detail, but they actually corresponded with me and asked me if there was anything in particular I would need, how soon I could start, etc. It was an easy process.

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how long it takes to get respond from them? –  noisy Oct 20 '11 at 19:38
    
I don't think it took very long. Less than a week. –  Rob Lourens Oct 21 '11 at 3:28
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I applied four different times and finally got approved more than 7 months after my first try, and just over a month after my fourth attempt. My first attempt was very specific and listed several projects, but my later attempts were increasingly generic and less impressive-sounding as I became less and less enthusiastic. I think for my fourth attempt I just said I wanted to make a game and didn't go into any detail. I'm pretty sure that was the one that got me in, and my earlier attempts were rejected.

The only correspondence I received in relation to my applications received were the four, "Thanks for applying; we'll keep in touch," e-mails and the eventual, "Welcome to the program!" e-mail.

Keep in mind that you, as the developer, have to pay for your app's data consumption. Above all, I would recommend not being too specific and not trying to make your project sound too ambitious. If you don't hear back within a month or so, try again.

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Could you explain mor on the data usage cost? Also, do they not tell you anything if they deny you? –  Sirens Jun 9 '13 at 19:34
    
I don't recall for certain, but I think there's a per-KB rate for 3G data consumption (at least, on the e-ink Kindles...I'm not sure about the Fire). You, as the developer, pay that rate since the consumer gets free 3G. No, Amazon doesn't tell you if you've been denied; you just have to keep applying. I kept trying and eventually got into the program shortly after the launch of the Kindle Fire. If it's been more than a month or two since you last applied, I'd suggest applying again. –  rob Jun 9 '13 at 23:55
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It makes sense to think about the motivations of Amazon and how that would restrict what they would allow. For instance:

  • They would like to make lots on money.
    • Proposing a way of selling lots of copies of your app, or proposing a very marketable app would make them like you.
    • Any apps that could bypass their revenue sources wouldn't be allowed. For instance file-sharing, or free ebook type apps.
  • They don't want it hacked.
    • Although it possible has been, Amazon won't allow you to create Apps that could become a security vulnerablility.

I general, you should write your proposal as a developer with good faith, outlining your idea and showing you have took Amazon's revenue protection into account, or that your going to make lots of money, or present something usefull for their users.

Also, I wouldn't suggest anything that would obviously put to much strain on the Kindle. I think anything more intensive than solitaire is a no no.

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Interestingly enough, Amazon released the full source code for the Kindle, which pretty much guaranteed it would be hacked (and it has been). –  Tom Tresansky Jun 2 '11 at 12:32
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I tried two times to get the KDK and both times Amazone never answered after the short e-mail which confirmed that they will check my request. I was waiting for acceptance or rejection for more than a year.

I finaly jailbreaked my kindle and will now try to develop for it without the KDK.

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Could you tell us how the jail broken development is going? –  Sirens Jun 9 '13 at 19:34
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I had a similar experience to some described here. I applied twice, got a robot answer saying Amazon would look at it, and they never did.

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