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I'm trying to create a dialog box at the start of my program that allows the user to input a number that is then used in another function (actually in another C file) much later on in the program.

void function()
{
double variable;
char buf[256] = "400";
sprintf( buf, "%d", variable);
#ifdef WIN32
edit_dialog(NULL,"Enter variable", "Please enter the variable:", buf,260);
#endif
variable = atof(buf);
}

I'd like to pass 'variable' into another function later on in the program. The problem is, I don't need the variable until much later. I don't want to pass it between each and every function until it gets to the right part of the program. How do I do this?

Also when I launch this, I get the dialog box as I'd expect but the number in the box is not 400, as I would expect. Instead it is 2089881670(!) I assume I am handling memory incorrectly but don't understand why.

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try using sprintf( buf, "%lf", &variable); –  Mayank May 17 '11 at 13:27

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

For the 2089881670 problem, you should initialize your variable like this :

double variable=0;

For the variable created somewhere and used far far away, you could use a global/static variable (sic), like this :

static double variable;

void function()
{
char buf[256] = "400";
   sprintf( buf, "%d", variable);
   #ifdef WIN32
   edit_dialog(NULL,"Enter variable", "Please enter the variable:", buf,260);
   #endif
   variable = atof(buf);
}
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Thanks - I have changed it to 400, but it comes up as 0. Why is this? I'd like to set it to 400 by default, but the user can change that by editing the dialog box –  CaptainProg May 17 '11 at 13:25

I think sprintf needs &variable as third variable. Try using sprintf( buf, "%lf", &variable);

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Call your function with the address of the variable that will hold the value until you want to use it

void function(double *variable) {
    /* ... */
    *variable = 42;
}

and use the function like this

someotherfunction() {
    double variable;
    function(&variable);
    /* ... lots of code ... */
    /* ... and much later ... */
    use(variable);
}

Or, make function return the value rather than void and saving it through a pointer

double function(void) {
    return 42;
}

someotherfunction() {
    double variable;
    variable = function();
    /* ... lots of code ... */
    /* ... and much later ... */
    use(variable);
}
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Or... don't write any obscure code at all, but instead use a global constant. If the value needs to be changed, and you really must save it inside some other code file, then use a static at file scope. –  Lundin May 17 '11 at 14:03
    
What's obscure about the code in the answer above? Granted the much later on in the program is reduced to 2 comment lines ... but that is not that much different to what a real function should be: if the initialization and use of a variable are more than a screenful apart, it's time to re-organize the code. –  pmg May 17 '11 at 16:19
    
Well, do you actually write code like this in real world applications? If not, then the code is obscure by definition. –  Lundin May 18 '11 at 6:32
    
I understand what you say, but I don't agree the code is "obscure". I much prefer it to the introduction of a global. Does gcc count for a real world application? I imagine that using the -o flag will be "much later on in the program" after setting it. –  pmg May 18 '11 at 8:27

You can use global variables for that, as @Cédric Julien suggested. The second problem should be resolved if you change your sprintf( buf, "%d", variable); to sprintf(buf, "%d", (int)variable);, because %d parameter relates to integer types: http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cstdio/sprintf/

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Thanks. I had been confusing doubles and ints. It is true that using static double has allowed me to define the variable outside the function and then call it in the function, but then when I come to call the variable again later in the program (in a different C file) I receive a 'undeclared identifier' error, as if the variable doesn't exist. The two C files are linked and other variables are passed fine... –  CaptainProg May 17 '11 at 13:39
    
@Matt, have you tried declaring your variable as global non-static, e.g. double variable = 0; outside the function()? When you define something as static in C, it cannot be accessed from other .c files. –  Joulukuusi May 17 '11 at 14:13

"I'd like to pass 'variable' into another function later on in the program. The problem is, I don't need the variable until much later. I don't want to pass it between each and every function until it gets to the right part of the program. How do I do this?"

This is a pure program design problem, and has nothing to do with language syntax. If your user input is handled in main(), and then processed by some file that handles data processing, why would you need to "pass it between each and every function"? Pass it to the function that should handle it, end of story. You don't need no global variables.

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