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In Scala, you can use pattern matching to produce a result depending on the type of the input. For instance:

val title = content match {
    case blogPost: BlogPost => blogPost.blog.title + ": " + blogPost.title
    case blog: Blog => blog.title
}

In C#, I'd ideally like to be able to write:

var title = Visit(content,
    (BlogPost blogPost) => blogPost.Blog.Title + ": " + blogPost.Title,
    (Blog blog) => blog.Title
);

Is this possible? When I've tried writing it as a single method, I don't know how to specify the generics. The following implementation seems right, apart from getting the type checker to allow functions that accept subtypes of T:

    public TResult Visit<T, TResult>(T value, params Func<T, TResult>[] visitors)
    {
        foreach (var visitor in visitors)
        {
            if (visitor.Method.GetGenericArguments()[0].IsAssignableFrom(value.GetType()))
            {
                return visitor(value);
            }
        }
        throw new ApplicationException("No match");
    }

The closest I've gotten is to add the functions to an object individually, and then call visit on a value:

    public class Visitor<T, TResult>
    {
        private class Result
        {
            public bool HasResult;
            public TResult ResultValue;
        }

        private readonly IList<Func<T, Result>> m_Visitors = new List<Func<T, Result>>();

        public TResult Visit(T value)
        {
            foreach (var visitor in m_Visitors)
            {
                var result = visitor(value);
                if (result.HasResult)
                {
                    return result.ResultValue;
                }
            }
            throw new ApplicationException("No match");
        }

        public Visitor<T, TResult> Add<TIn>(Func<TIn, TResult> visitor) where TIn : T
        {
            m_Visitors.Add(value =>
            {
                if (value is TIn)
                {
                    return new Result { HasResult = true, ResultValue = visitor((TIn)value) };
                }
                return new Result { HasResult = false };
            });
            return this;
        }
    }

This can be used like so:

var title = new Visitor<IContent, string>()
    .Add((BlogPost blogPost) => blogPost.Blog.Title + ": " + blogPost.Title)
    .Add((Blog blog) => blog.Title)
    .Visit(content);

Any idea how to do this with a single method call?

share|improve this question
1  
Kinda looks like a dictionary where the key is a type and the value is a function... –  Roly May 17 '11 at 13:43
1  
Are you using C# 3 or 4? In C# 4 the Func type is contravariant in its formal parameter types, which gives you more flexibility in the conversions. –  Eric Lippert May 17 '11 at 14:09
    
@Eric Lippert: in this case, I think I actually want covariance rather than contravariance. I want to accept functions that might not be able to accept parameters of type T (whereas you'd usually want to accept any function that accept parameters of type T, which includes functions that accept parameters of type U, where T <: U) –  Michael Williamson May 17 '11 at 14:20
    
@Michael: If you want unsafe covariance on delegate types then you're likely to run into some difficulties. The type system is designed to help you prevent that sort of thing, not help you do it. –  Eric Lippert May 17 '11 at 14:23
    
@Eric: type safety is the reason for this piece of code: visitor.Method.GetGenericArguments()[0].IsAssignableFrom(value.GetType()). I want to allow functions that potentially might not accept the input, since I want to iterate through the passed functions and return the result from the first function that does accept the input. –  Michael Williamson May 17 '11 at 14:32

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Using Functional C# (from @Alireza)

var title = content.Match()
   .With<BlogPost>(blogPost => blogPost.Blog.Title + ": " + blogPost.Title)
   .With<Blog>(blog => blog.Title)
   .Result<string>();
share|improve this answer
    
The fact that Functional C# seems to use the same approach that I used, that is, passing in each lambda in separate method calls, seems to suggest that doing it all in a single method call just isn't possible (at least, while maintaining type safety). Ah, well. –  Michael Williamson May 19 '11 at 21:36

Pattern matching is one of those lovely features mostly found in functional programming languages like F#. There is a great project going on in codeplex named Functional C#. Consider the following F# code:

let operator x = match x with
                 | ExpressionType.Add -> "+"

let rec toString exp = match exp with
                       | LambdaExpression(args, body) -> toString(body)
                       | ParameterExpression(name) -> name
                       | BinaryExpression(op,l,r) -> sprintf "%s %s %s" (toString l) (operator op) (toString r)

Using the Functional C# library, the C# equivalent would be:

var Op = new Dictionary<ExpressionType, string> { { ExpressionType.Add, "+" } };

Expression<Func<int,int,int>> add = (x,y) => x + y;

Func<Expression, string> toString = null;
 toString = exp =>
 exp.Match()
    .With<LambdaExpression>(l => toString(l.Body))
    .With<ParameterExpression>(p => p.Name)
    .With<BinaryExpression>(b => String.Format("{0} {1} {2}", toString(b.Left), Op[b.NodeType], toString(b.Right)))
    .Return<string>();
share|improve this answer

In order to ensure total pattern matching, you would need to build the function into the type itself. Here's how I'd do it:

public abstract class Content
{
    private Content() { }

    public abstract T Match<T>(Func<Blog, T> convertBlog, Func<BlogPost, T> convertPost);

    public class Blog : Content
    {
        public Blog(string title)
        {
            Title = title;
        }
        public string Title { get; private set; }

        public override T Match<T>(Func<Blog, T> convertBlog, Func<BlogPost, T> convertPost)
        {
            return convertBlog(this);
        }
    }

    public class BlogPost : Content
    {
        public BlogPost(string title, Blog blog)
        {
            Title = title;
            Blog = blog;
        }
        public string Title { get; private set; }
        public Blog Blog { get; private set; }

        public override T Match<T>(Func<Blog, T> convertBlog, Func<BlogPost, T> convertPost)
        {
            return convertPost(this);
        }
    }

}

public static class Example
{
    public static string GetTitle(Content content)
    {
        return content.Match(blog => blog.Title, post => post.Blog.Title + ": " + post.Title);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Check out my pattern matching implementation: repo

It's based on expressions, so it offers equal perfomance with nested ifs.

Example usage:

string s1 = "Hello";
string s2 = null;

Func<Option<string>> match = new Matcher<Option<string>>
{
     {s => s is None, s => Console.WriteLine("None")},
     {s => s is Some, s => Console.WriteLine((string)s) // or s.Value
};

match(s1); // Hello
match(s2); // None

Available throught NuGet: Nuget package

share|improve this answer
    
Post necessary code snippets, please. –  Christian St. Apr 23 at 8:32

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