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I have N multidimensional source data arrays, each with the same number of columns (C=4 in this example), but any number of rows:

var array1 = new double[,]
  {
    { 1, 2, 3, 4 },
    { 5, 6, 7, 8 },
    { 9, 10, 11, 12 }
  };

var array2 = new double[,]
  {
    { 1, 2, 5, 6 },
    { 7, 8, 9, 10 },
    { 9, 10, 11, 12 }
  };

var array3 = new double[,]
  {
    { 1, 2, 7, 8 },
    { 13, 14, 15, 16 }
  };

...
var arrayN = new double[,] { ... };

I also have an array that specifies which indices in the source arrays are to be used as the join keys:

var keyArray = new int[] { 0, 1 };

I need to join the arrays in such as way that the resulting array will look like:

var result = new double[,]
{
  // The length of each element in this array will be (C x N),
  // the first C elements will be from array1, the next C from 
  // array2, and so on, and nulls used for arrays elements that 
  // are not included in the join (keys don't match).
  //
  // The number of rows in this array will be the number of distinct key combinations.
  { 1, 2, 3, 4, 1, 2, 5, 6, 1, 2, 7, 8 },
  { 5, 6, 7, 8, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null },
  { 9, 10, 11, 12, 9, 10, 11, 12, null, null, null, null },
  { null, null, null, null, 7, 8, 9, 10, null, null, null, null },
  { null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, 13, 14, 15, 16 }
};

I am thinking I need to select the distinct keys from each source array and loop through all of the data and compare each row, etc. to fill the results array. However, there should be a more efficient way to do this using LINQ - can anyone help?

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3  
Your result doesn't make any sense. Why is the first and third of 4 doubles being merged into 8.. but both of the second get a new row? –  Theun Arbeider May 17 '11 at 14:13
    
It's doing a join across both arrays using the first 2 columns as keys. Since array1[0] and array2[0] have matching keys, and array1[2] and array2[2] also have matching keys, they are combined together into result[0] and result[2]. Since there are no matching keys on the other elements, they each get their own row in the results array. I hope that makes sense... I'm basically trying to do an outer join on two arrays based on dynamically-defined keys, using LINQ. –  Kevin May 17 '11 at 14:18
    
With matching keys I assume you mean the first number in the double array? –  Theun Arbeider May 17 '11 at 14:35
1  
Unfortunately not so simple - I mean each index of the source arrays that are contained within the keyArray array. So in this example (0 and 1) - it joins on the first and second numbers in the double array. But it could be joining based on any or all of the indices... –  Kevin May 17 '11 at 14:39
    
It is still not clear to me how your handling "multiple foreign keys". One thing I don't understand for example is what happens when the first key has a match but the second does not. –  insipid May 17 '11 at 15:03

2 Answers 2

Here is a solution if you use double[][] instead of double[,]

var array1 = new double[][]
            {
              new double[] {1,2,3,4},
              new double[] {5,6,7,8},
              new double[] {9,10,11,12}
            };

var array2 = new double[][]
            {
              new double[] {1,2,5,6},
              new double[] {7,8,9,10},
              new double[] {9,10,11,12}
            };

var key = new int[] { 0, 1 };

 double?[][] result = (from a in array1
                       from b in array2.Where(bi => key.Select(k => bi[k] == a[k])
                                                       .Aggregate((k1, k2) => k1 && k2))
                                       .DefaultIfEmpty()
                       select a.Select(an => (double?)an)
                               .Concat(b == null ?
                                       a.Select(an => (double?)null) :
                                       b.Select(bn => (double?)bn))
                               .ToArray()
                       ).Union
                       (from b in array2
                        from a in array1.Where(ai => key.Select(k => ai[k] == b[k])
                                                        .Aggregate((k1, k2) => k1 && k2))
                                        .DefaultIfEmpty()
                        where a == null
                        select b.Select(bn => (double?)null)
                                .Concat(b.Select(bn =>(double?)bn))
                                .ToArray()
                        ).ToArray();
share|improve this answer
    
+1: I think double[][] is "more correct" for this purpose, anyway. See vbforums.com/showthread.php?t=517717#edit3195930 –  StriplingWarrior May 17 '11 at 15:53

I have a solution for you. It may not be as clean as you are looking for, but it will work. It would require that you change your use of arrays from:

var array1 = new double[,] to: var array1 = new double?[][]

as .NET views the first as a single IEnumerable instead of IEnumerable>. Plus to support the nulls you have to use a nullable-double. The following code does expect that all jagged arrays are of the same size.

Next you have to define a class to hold the dynamic key(s) and do the compare:

class Keys : IEquatable<Keys>
{
    private IEnumerable<double?> _keys = Enumerable.Empty<double?>();

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        int hash = 23;
        foreach (var element in _keys)
        {
            hash = hash * 37 + element.GetValueOrDefault().GetHashCode();
        }

        return hash;
    }

    public bool Equals(Keys other)
    {
        if (other == null)
            return false;

        if (_keys.Count() != other._keys.Count())
            return false;

        for (int index = 0; index < _keys.Count(); index++)
        {
            if (_keys.ElementAt(index) != other._keys.ElementAt(index))
                return false;
        }

        return true;
    }

    public Keys(double?[] data, int[] indexes)
    {
        var keys = new List<double?>();
        foreach (var index in indexes)
        {
            keys.Add(data[index]);
        }
        _keys = keys;
    }
}

Then you have the following logic to do the query and return an double?[][] that you would expect:

// Create full join of selection
var fullJoin = (from l in array1
                join r in array2 on new Keys(l, keyArray) equals new Keys(r, keyArray) into g
                from r in g.DefaultIfEmpty()
                select new { l, r})
               .Concat
               (from r in array2
                join l in array1 on new Keys(r, keyArray) equals new Keys(l, keyArray) into g
                from l in g.DefaultIfEmpty()
                where l == null
                select new {l, r});

// Create the final result set
var results = fullJoin.Select(i => 
{ 
    var list = new List<double?>(); 
    if (i.l != null)
    {
        list.AddRange(i.l); 
    }
    else
    {
        list.AddRange(Enumerable.Repeat((double?)null, i.r.Length));
    }
    if (i.r != null)
    {
        list.AddRange(i.r); 
    }
    else
    {
        list.AddRange(Enumerable.Repeat((double?)null, i.l.Length));
    }
    return list.ToArray();
}).ToArray();
share|improve this answer
    
Hey, thanks alot for that Adam! It looks great, but unfortunately relies on having only 2 source arrays, when there might be any number. I am not sure if it is possible to modify the fullJoin LINQ query to be able to use a dynamic set of source arrays... –  Kevin May 17 '11 at 15:59
    
@Kevin - I guess I missed that requirement. I will have to ponder that one a little bit. Having that part be dynamic does make it a bit trickier. –  Adam Gritt May 17 '11 at 16:28

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