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Forgive any ignorance of C++ type deduction in this, but I'd like to be able to carry around the parameter pack's definition, so that later I could test for an inner type. Is this possible? Something like:

template <typename... Args> struct Entity {

    struct Inner {
        typedef Args... entity_args_t;
    };

    struct SomeOtherInner {
        typedef Args... entity_args_t;
    };
};

struct ThingA : Entity<int, string> {
};

struct ThingB : Entity<string, string> {
};

//Want to accept variations of Entity<...>::Inner,
//not Entity<...>::SomeOtherInner
template<typename I>
struct is_Entity_Inner {
    static const bool value
        = is_same<
            typename Entity<typename I::entity_args_t...>::Inner
            , I
        >::value
    ;
};

Oui? Non?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Define:

template<typename ...> struct types;

Then:

template <typename... Args> struct Entity {

    struct Inner {
        typedef types<Args...> entity_args_t;
    };

    struct SomeOtherInner {
        typedef types<Args...> entity_args_t;
    };
};

Then you can pass entity_args_t to a template that has a partial specialization for types<T...>. If you typedef the Entity, you can instead write a partial specialization for Entity<T...>, which may make more sense for your case

template <typename... Args> struct Entity {

    struct Inner {
        // Equivalent: typedef Entity entity_args_t;
        typedef Entity<Args...> entity_args_t;
    };

    struct SomeOtherInner {
        typedef Entity<Args...> entity_args_t;
    };
};

So having a typedef for entity_args_t equal Entity<Args...>, you could write this as follows (untested, but should work):

template<typename ProbablyInner, typename ProbablyEntity>
struct is_inner_impl : std::false_type 
{ };

template<typename ProbablyInner, typename ...Args>
struct is_inner_impl<ProbablyInner, Entity<Args...>> 
  : std::is_same<
      typename Entity<Args...>::Inner
      ProbablyInner>
{ };

template<typename ProbablyInner, typename = std::true_type>
struct is_inner : std::false_type 
{ };

template<typename ProbablyInner>
struct is_inner<ProbablyInner, 
  std::integral_constant<bool, is_inner_impl<
    ProbablyInner, 
    typename ProbablyInner::entity_args_t>::value>>
  : std::true_type 
{ };
share|improve this answer
    
So, in the is_Entity_Inner metafunction, I would instead have is_same<typename I::entity_args_t::template Inner, I>::value? –  Brett Rossier May 17 '11 at 16:05
    
@pheedbaq see update. –  Johannes Schaub - litb May 17 '11 at 16:11
    
@pheedbaq the critical point is where you access ::entity_args_t. If you want is_inner yield false for arbitrary other types, you have to access the type in an SFINAE context, so that if there is no member called ::entity_args_t, that there is no hard compile time error. –  Johannes Schaub - litb May 17 '11 at 16:25
    
@litb Not entirely sure I grasp your last comment. Is that what typename = void is accomplishing as the second parameter of is_inner? If a ::entity_args_t member exists, then the compiler matches it to the specialization. If not, even though the member doesn't exist, it matches it with typename = void version? –  Brett Rossier May 17 '11 at 16:35
    
@pheedbaq i subsequently changed my code to not use enable_if. I think it bloats the code. If ::entity_args_t exists, then it can consider the specialization and whether it matches the arguments (the arguments are <whatever is passed, void>). enable_if as used will always yield void in the success-case (if a member exists). In the non-success case (which is when is_inner_impl<>::value evaluates to false), there exist no ::type member, and so a SFINAE error occurs. Roughly similar things go on with my integral_constant<> version now. –  Johannes Schaub - litb May 17 '11 at 16:37

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