Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the followiing javascript if conditions in an .asp page:

<%@language="javascript"%>

var operator = new String("opstr")
operator.permissions = 2

if((operator.permissions & 1) == 1)
    // ... 
if((operator.permissions & 2) == 2)
    // ...

Can someone please explain what is happening in the if conditions listed above?

Thanks.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

Read the MDC article on Bitwise Operators

if((operator.permissions & 1) == 1)

A bit wise equal. 1 & 1 === 1, 2 & 1 === 0, 3 & 1 === 1

if((operator.permissions & 2) == 2)

Another bit wise equal 1 & 2 === 0, 2 & 2 === 2, 3 & 2 === 2

share|improve this answer

In this particular piece of code, the second if statement will always run. This is because operator.permissions & 2 will always evaluate to 2 (since the variable is being set to 2 earlier on).

The & is a bit-wise AND. 2 is binary is 10 (in 32-bits it would be 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0010). When you do a bit-wise AND the values are converted into binary (signed 32-bit big endian) and each bit of one operand is ANDed with the other. When you AND two equal values, you get the same value as a result.

A few examples (I'm using 4-bit values here for readability):

1 & 1 = 0001 & 0001 = 0001 = 1
2 & 1 = 0010 & 0001 = 0000 = 0
3 & 1 = 0011 & 0001 = 0001 = 1
...
5 & 1 = 0101 & 0001 = 0001 = 1

and,

1 & 2 = 0001 & 0010 = 0000 = 0
2 & 2 = 0010 & 0010 = 0010 = 2
3 & 2 = 0011 & 0010 = 0010 = 2
...
6 & 2 = 0110 & 0010 = 0010 = 2
share|improve this answer

These are bitwise operators. Read here: http://www.devguru.com/technologies/ecmascript/quickref/bitwise_operators.html for more.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.