Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have been programming in Java, PHP, Python for a while.
But my knowledge in programming languages is not that good.
I have been reading a few blogs on functional programming(FP) these days and the whole new concept of Functional Programming seems to be quite interesting.
I want to learn things about programming languages like static languages, dynamic languages, static scoping, dynamic scoping, static typing ,Duck typing , closures etc etc
I want to know what all resources should i go through to get a step by step and perfect knowledge of all the terms mentioned above.
The important thing here is the sequence in which all these things are to be studied.

share|improve this question

closed as not constructive by Rafe Kettler, Jay Riggs, Kev, Brian Roach, AJ. May 17 '11 at 18:19

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
This is way too broad to be answerable. –  Rafe Kettler May 17 '11 at 18:09
    
i just want the resources for the answers of my questions :) –  Arihant Nahata May 17 '11 at 18:10
    
@Arihant still too broad. There are limitless resources. A more specific question would be better (e.g. where can I read about closures, or Haskell, or Scheme, or whatever) –  Rafe Kettler May 17 '11 at 18:11
    
@rafe: So if i want to learn about the terms which i mentioned above( eg: dynamic scoping, static typing ,Duck typing , closures ), i have to use a functional programming language ? –  Arihant Nahata May 17 '11 at 18:13
2  
@Arihant: I think you could try one of the following depending on your preference: "Programming languages: Application and Interpretation", "Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs", "Essentials of Programming Languages". –  Artyom Shalkhakov May 18 '11 at 11:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There is a book You would probably like - "Seven languages in seven weeks" - http://pragprog.com/titles/btlang/seven-languages-in-seven-weeks

share|improve this answer
    
Doing what with those seven languages in seven weeks? Taking a brief look at them sounds realistic, actually learning to use them or even getting into the midset of the associated paradigm seems outright impossible. –  delnan May 17 '11 at 18:18
    
"As a programmer, the importance of being exposed to new program- ming languages, paradigms, and techniques cannot be overstated. This book does a marvelous job of introducing seven important and diverse languages in a concise—but nontrivial—manner, revealing their strengths and reasons for being." –  Peri May 18 '11 at 20:00
    
And -1 for what? It is accepted answer if you didn't notice. –  Peri Mar 8 '12 at 17:18

You may want to look at the List of freely available programming books. I also find the Hello, World Page interesting.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.