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I'm trying to parse JSON result from an Ajax call to .NET web service like the following:

function doAjaxCallBack() {

      $.ajax({
           type: "POST",
           url: "AjaxCallBackService.asmx/GetAllTitles",
           contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8",
           dataType: "json",
           success: function (msg) {

               // show alert book title and tags to test JSON result

           },

      });
}

Here's the JSON result I got back from doAjaxCallBack:

{"d":[
    {
        "__type":"ASP.NET_Training.Book",
        "Price":12.3,
        "Title":"Javascript Programming",
        "Tag":["Ajax","Javascript"]
    },
    {
        "__type":"ASP.NET_Training.Book",
        "Price":14.23,
        "Title":"Code Complete",
        "Tag":["Programming","Concept"]
    }
]}

I want to get book title and its tags. How do I loop over this kind of JSON?

Thank you.

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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You're getting back an Object with one property d, which references an Array of objects.

You can use the jQuery.each()[docs] method to iterate over that Array, and select the Title and Tag properties from each Object in the Array.

$.each(msg.d, function( i, val ) {
    console.log(val.Title);
    $.each(val.Tag, function( i, val ) {
        console.log("Tag: " + val);
    });
});

Live Example: http://jsfiddle.net/emSXt/3/ (open your console)

share|improve this answer
    
First glance, I thought this would only give me first object, because Tag has its own JSON data also. I was thinking of writing two loops. The outer loop loops through those objects. The inner loop loops through the properties on each object element. But your solution is good. But why only one loop though? Because I also need a separated tag. Maybe my question is not clear enough. Sorry about that. still, you got my vote. –  Narazana May 17 '11 at 20:04
    
@Narazana: Yes, I didn't know what you wanted to do with the Tag array. Just do another loop the same way. I'll update. –  user113716 May 17 '11 at 20:08
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 $.each(msg.d, function( i, value ) {
 console.log(value.Title);
 if($.isArray(value.Tag)) {
     $.each(value.Tag, function(j, value1) {
         console.log(value1);
     });
 }else {
     console.log(value.Tag);
 }
});

Here's a fiddle http://jsfiddle.net/ATBNx/

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for(var ib in msg.d) {
  alert(msg.d[ib].Title);
  for(var it in msg.d[ib].Tag) {
    alert(msg.d[ib].Tag[it]);
  }     
}
share|improve this answer
    
In JavaScript it is best not to use for-in on an Array. –  user113716 May 17 '11 at 19:45
    
@patrick-dw is right. for-in would actually iterate through Array properties like length. Its not recommended to use for-in for arrays.. –  Aravin R May 17 '11 at 19:54
    
I didn't know. Thanks guys –  Julien May 17 '11 at 19:56
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