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Here is a part of my HTML:

<div class="editor-field">
    <input id="ImmobilizationLength_1" name="ImmobilizationLength" type="text" value="">
</div>
....
*HTML Code*
....
<div class="editor-field">
    <input id="ImmobilizationLength_2" name="ImmobilizationLength" type="text" value="">
</div>

When I want to validate these fields with jQuery, I add to the rules:

ImmobilizationLength: { required: true, digits: true }

When the form is submitted, only the first the ImmobilizationLength field is validated.

I read on stackoverflow an other question about that, which recommends to use:

$('[name="ImmobilizationLength"]').each(function(){
    $(this).rules("add", { required: true, digits: true } );   
});

But, when I do that, I get this error:

TypeError: Cannot read property 'nodeName' of undefined

How can I do?

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4  
ids should always be unique and names within forms should be also. Why can't you make them both unique and change the jquery accordingly? –  Laurence Burke May 17 '11 at 19:49
    
Laurence is correct - id's are meant to be unique on a page. You could use a class selector to apply validation to similar items. The class can be anything, it doesn't have to actually exist in a stylesheet. –  camainc May 17 '11 at 19:58
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3 Answers

you can not have items with the same id selectors will not work also if they have the same name when you post the data will not be correct. unless you use namearray

like

 name="ImmobilizationLength[]"

for example

<div class="editor-field">
    <input id="input_1"  name="input_1" class="test" type="text" value="">
</div>

Based on the comments once you change the Id you could use starts with selector

 $('[id^="input_"]').each(...
....
*HTML Code*
....
<div class="editor-field">
       <input id="input_2"  name="input_2" class="test" type="text" value="">
</div>

I would would give them a class and rule based on class name

$.validator.addClassRules({
       test: {
           digits: true,
           required: true
       }
});
share|improve this answer
    
@Tuizi what do you mean by "but my html is from a static source" this is not a page you have control of ? –  mcgrailm May 17 '11 at 20:16
    
No... –  Tuizi May 17 '11 at 20:23
    
Then why/ how are you validating it ? –  mcgrailm May 17 '11 at 20:25
    
Then why/ how are you validating it ? Also at bare min I would suggest u talk to the person who has control and let them know they are generating invalid HTML –  mcgrailm May 17 '11 at 20:33
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According to W3Schools, ID must be unique:

"The id attribute specifies a unique id for an HTML element. The id must be unique within the HTML document."

http://www.w3schools.com/tags/att_standard_id.asp

Your Javascript will not work as expected since the markup is invalid. When the markup is corrected (by creating unique IDs, and optionally adding a class), you will easily be able to validate your unique fields.

Please note that unlike IDs, classes can be repeated. Names should not be repeated, because the values of each field will overwrite each other if the form is submitted.

EDIT:

The duplicate names are still a problem. If you want to use each(), you will need to use an identifier that can be duplicated, like class.

$('[name="ImmobilizationLength"]').each(function(){ 
});

will become

$('.test').each(function(){
});
share|improve this answer
    
Ok now, I have different ID but jQuery doesn't validate the second field... –  Tuizi May 17 '11 at 20:21
    
Can you post your updated HTML with unique IDs, and any relevant Javascript changes? You can make this change by editing the original question. –  George Cummins May 17 '11 at 20:24
    
Ok, question updated! –  Tuizi May 17 '11 at 20:43
1  
The duplicate names are still a problem. If you want to use each(), you will need to use an identifier that can be duplicated, like class. "$('[name="ImmobilizationLength"]').each(function(){" will become "$('.test').each(function(){" –  George Cummins May 17 '11 at 20:59
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Here is how I solved a similar problem I was having. Though instead of validating, I was dynamically setting the values. However the same basic logic can be applied:

function validateFieldValues( fields )
{
    if ( 'length' in fields ) 
    {
        // We got a collection of form fields
        for ( var x = 0; x < fields.length; x++ ) {
            doValidation( fields[x].value );
        }
    }
    else
    {
        // We got a single form field
        doValidation( fields.value );
    }
}

function submitHandler( oForm )
{
    // Get the element collection of <input> elements with the same name
    var someNameElmts = oForm.elements.someName;

    // *should* always exist.  But just in case...
    if ( someNameElmts ) {
        validateFieldValues( someNameElmts );
    } else {
        // deal with it
    }
}

In the HTML:

<form 
method="post" 
name="someForm" 
id="someFormID" 
action="/some/path" 
onsubmit="submitHandler(this);">

Hope that helps!

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah yeah.. it's an old question, but I had an answer so I figured it couldn't hurt to post. :-) –  Bob FiveThousand Jan 31 '12 at 13:59
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