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I have two very large tables to merge and so I have been trying to optomize the update for speed. I noticed that doing the update partially in PHP speeded it up significantly so I assumed this means I'm not be doing the MySQL properly.

I have simplified the problem to try and narrow it down ...

GRID_TABLE                                  POSTCODE_TABLE
idNo, lat,  lng,  nearestPostcode           postcode,  lat,   lng
________________________________            _____________________
1     57.1  -2.3  -                         AB12 3BA   56.3  -2.5
2     56.8  -1.9  -                         AB12 1YA   56.2  -2.3
. . .                                       . . .

(200 entries)                               (35,000 entries)

I want to update the GRID_TABLE with the nearestPostcode from the POSTCODE_TABLE using latitude (lat) and longitude (lng) to find the nearest postcode to each grid point...

update grid_table set nearestPostcode = (
    select postcode from postcode_table 
    where lat > grid_table.lat -0.0037 and lat < grid_table.lat +0.0037 
        and lng > grid_table.lng -0.0068 and lng < grid_table.lng +0.0068
    order by POW(lat - grid_table.lat,2) + POW((lng - grid_table.lng) *0.546,2) 
    limit 1 
    )

The idea is that the 'where' clause speeds up the search by using indexes to narrow the set down to a few candidates and then the 'order by' clause finds the nearest one within this set.

This MySQL update takes 30 secs, but if I instead update each GRID_TABLE row individually in PHP it's over in the blink of an eye.

$queryStg = "select * from grid_table ;";
$sqlQuery1 = mysqli_query($mysqliLink, $queryStg);

while( $sqlRow = mysqli_fetch_assoc( $sqlQuery1 ) ) {

    $idNo = $sqlRow['idNo'];
    $lat = $sqlRow['lat'];
    $lng = $sqlRow['lng'];

    $queryStg = "
        update grid_table
            set nearestPostcode = (
                SELECT postcode
                FROM postcode_table
                where
                    lat > " . ($lat - 0.0037) . " and
                    lat < " . ($lat + 0.0037) . " and
                    lng > " . ($lng - 0.0068) . " and
                    lng < " . ($lng + 0.0068) . "
                ORDER BY
                    POW(lat - $lat, 2) +
                    POW((lng - $lng) * 0.546, 2)
                    ASC
                limit 1
                )
            where idNo= $idNo;
        ";

    $sqlQuery2 = mysqli_query($mysqliLink, $queryStg);

}

Surely the MySQL version should be faster than the PHP version?

Here is the MySQL for the tables...

CREATE TABLE `grid_table` (
    `idNo` INT(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
    `lat` FLOAT(6,4) NOT NULL COMMENT 'latitude',
    `lng` FLOAT(6,4) NOT NULL COMMENT 'longitude',
    `nearestPostcode` CHAR(8) NOT NULL,
    PRIMARY KEY (`idNo`),
    INDEX `lat_lng` (`lat`, `lng`)
)
ENGINE=MyISAM
ROW_FORMAT=DEFAULT
AUTO_INCREMENT=30047
CREATE TABLE `postcode_table` (
    `postcode` CHAR(8) NOT NULL,
    `lat` FLOAT(6,4) NOT NULL COMMENT 'latitude',
    `lng` FLOAT(6,4) NOT NULL COMMENT 'longitude',
    PRIMARY KEY (`postcode`),
    INDEX `lat` (`lat`),
    INDEX `lng` (`lng`),
    INDEX `lat_lng` (`lat`, `lng`)
)
ENGINE=MyISAM
ROW_FORMAT=DEFAULT

MySQL import file is here... https://docs.google.com/leaf?id=0B93lksnTC7_cM2Y2ZDk1Y2YtMGQ3Yy00OTIxLTk0ZDAtZmE2NmQ3YTc1ZWRm&hl=en

(if you run the UPDATE, 10 nearestPostcodes will be added).

UPDATE AFTER ANSWERS...

I ran this...

explain extended
 SELECT postcode FROM postcode_table 
 where lat > 57.0 and lat < 57.0074
 and lng > -2.013 and lng < -2
 ORDER BY POW(lat - 57.0, 2) + POW((lng - -2) * 0.546, 2) ASC 

It returned...

id,select_type,table,type,possible_keys,key,key_len,ref,rows,filtered,Extra
1,SIMPLE,postcode_table,range,lat,lng,lat_lng,lat_lng,8,NULL,65,100.00,Using where; Using filesort

Removing the 'order by' caluse -> no difference in speed.

Simplifying the 'where' clause by removing 'lng', ie

where lat between grid_table.lat - 0.0037 and grid_table.lat + 0.0037 
-> faster: 3 secs rather than 30 secs.

Using spatial column and index (see below) -> much slower (190 sec). Not sure if I implemented this correctly though.

ALTER TABLE `grid_table` ADD COLUMN `coords` POINT NOT NULL;
update grid_table set coords = POINT(lat, lng);
ALTER TABLE `grid_table` ADD SPATIAL INDEX `coords` (`coords`);

ALTER TABLE `postcode_table` ADD COLUMN `coords` POINT NOT NULL;
update postcode_table set coords = POINT(lat, lng);
ALTER TABLE `postcode_table` ADD SPATIAL INDEX `coords` (`coords`);

analyze table grid_table;
optimize table grid_table;
analyze table postcode_table;
optimize table postcode_table;
update grid_table set nearestPostcode = (
    select postcode from postcode_table 
    WHERE MBRContains(GeomFromText(concat(
         'POLYGON((', 
          grid_table.lat - 0.0037, ' ', grid_table.lng - 0.0068, ', ',
          grid_table.lat - 0.0037, ' ', grid_table.lng + 0.0068, ', ',
          grid_table.lat + 0.0037, ' ', grid_table.lng - 0.0068, ', ',
          grid_table.lat - 0.0037, ' ', grid_table.lng - 0.0068, 
          '))')), postcode_table.coords)
     order by POW(lat - grid_table.lat,2) + POW((lng - grid_table.lng) *0.546,2)
     limit 1 
     )
share|improve this question
    
An index on lng in table GRID_TABLE would be needed. See the query plans (both now and after adding this index). –  ypercube May 17 '11 at 20:41
    
Hi @ypercube. added index on lng. No difference in speed. –  spiderplant0 May 17 '11 at 20:49
    
The query is appeared to be very fast in PHP probably because it is being cached. –  John Cartwright May 17 '11 at 21:01
    
Hi @John-Cartwright. You mean I'm getting a false reading? –  spiderplant0 May 17 '11 at 21:06
1  
@spiderplant: I think the best possible solution is to use a spatial object (POINT) and spatial index, instead of storing lat and lng. See MySQL spatial extensiions: dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/spatial-extensions.html –  ypercube May 17 '11 at 21:30
show 6 more comments

3 Answers 3

In your MySQL version your subquery works with all 30000 grid_table records, whether in your PHP version -- it's only one. As you add where on outer table PK.

I suggest you here to change update query. For example, try to make it without subquery, multiple-update as here http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/update.html.

I believe it should help.

Something like:

update grid_table, postcode_table
set grid_table.nearestPostcode = postcode_table.postcode
where postcode_table.lat > grid_table.lat - 0.0037
and postcode_table.lat < grid_table.lat + 0.0037 
and postcode_table.lng > grid_table.lng - 0.0068
and lng < grid_table.lng + 0.0068
group by grid_table.idNo
having (POW(lat - grid_table.lat,2) + POW((lng - grid_table.lng) *0.546,2)) = min(POW(lat - grid_table.lat,2) + POW((lng - grid_table.lng) *0.546,2))

May be this version could help, but I`m not sure. I assume, the main root problem in your 1st version is subquery over all records.

To have explain update, you can "convert" it to similar select:

explain
select
    *,
    (
        select postcode from postcode_table
        where lat > grid_table.lat -0.0037 and lat < grid_table.lat +0.0037
            and lng > grid_table.lng -0.0068 and lng < grid_table.lng +0.0068
        order by POW(lat - grid_table.lat,2) + POW((lng - grid_table.lng) *0.546,2)
        limit 1
    ) nearestPostcode   
from grid_table

And you will see:

id  select_type table   type    possible_keys   key key_len ref rows    Extra
1   PRIMARY grid_table  ALL                 224 
2   DEPENDENT SUBQUERY  postcode_table  ALL lat,lng,lat_lng             35605   Using where; Using temporary; Using filesort

But in case of idNo we have:

explain
select
    *,
    (
        select postcode from postcode_table
        where lat > grid_table.lat -0.0037 and lat < grid_table.lat +0.0037
            and lng > grid_table.lng -0.0068 and lng < grid_table.lng +0.0068
        order by POW(lat - grid_table.lat,2) + POW((lng - grid_table.lng) *0.546,2)
        limit 1
    ) nearestPostcode   
from grid_table
where idNo = 1487;

id  select_type table   type    possible_keys   key key_len ref rows    Extra
1   PRIMARY grid_table  const   PRIMARY PRIMARY 4   const   1   
2   DEPENDENT SUBQUERY  postcode_table  range   lat,lng,lat_lng lat 4       18  Using where; Using filesort

So we have 35605 rows vs ~18*224 (~4000).

To find correct query try to find good select 1st.

Update

Subquery isn't a root here :( So I think we should try some precalculated + indexed column may be. Target is to avoid order by SOMEFUNC()

share|improve this answer
    
@update: there is no way to avoid order by somefunc(). Distance has to be calculated between every combination of grid point and postcode in given range. And the main cause of query being slower than the php version is indeed subquery and mysql inability to use indexes on where clause for correlated subquery. If you remove order by you should see full scan of postcode table too. Distance calculation and sorting is done on very limited set of rows, it's not the root cause. –  piotrm May 18 '11 at 12:16
    
@piotrm, f..ck... Then we need another theory. –  gaRex May 18 '11 at 13:10
    
hi @gaRex. I'm struggling to understand your first suggestion. Are you sure you can use 'GROUP BY' with an 'UPDATE'? dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.6/en/update.html –  spiderplant0 May 18 '11 at 13:22
    
Also the 35,000 records is for the postcode_table. The grid_table has just 200 rows. –  spiderplant0 May 18 '11 at 13:23
    
@gaRex Thanks for the tip on converting update to select to view use of indexes. –  spiderplant0 May 18 '11 at 13:28
show 3 more comments

Look at the execution plan to know what is taking so long. http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.5/en/execution-plan-information.html

share|improve this answer
    
I ran optimise and analyse and ran 'explain'. Trouble is this only works for 'select' and both the php and mysql versions use the same select. Running 'Explain' reports that is is using a 'range' on key 'lat' –  spiderplant0 May 17 '11 at 20:46
add comment

My guess is that the difference is due to your providing the value of $lat with in the row-by-row query, thereby saving large scans for the lookup here:-

order by POW(lat - grid_table.lat,2)

Like Mr47 says, you'll be able to see by EXPLAIN-ing the SQL statements.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi @davek. I'm not sure I understand you. Are you saying that there is a good reason that the PHP is faster. Or are you saying there is something I can do to speed up the MySQL? See results of running EXPLAIN above? –  spiderplant0 May 17 '11 at 20:51
    
I mean that in the first version you are forcing mysql to do much more "lookup" work as you define a variable in your subquery, whereas in your second, you provide the value (as gaRex has said). It's not a question of PHP vs. MySQL (its all SQL in the end), but of how you structure your queries. Your second version is much faster as, although you're firing off multiple queries (more work) as opposed to just one, this is more than offset by reducing subquery lookups. –  davek May 18 '11 at 8:23
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