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I have two selects:

SELECT id FROM a -- returns 1,4,2,3
UNION
SELECT id FROM b -- returns 2,1

I'm receiving correct num of rows, like: 1,4,2,3.

But I want b table results first: 2,1,4,3 or 2,1,3,4

How can I do this?

(I'm using Oracle)

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4 Answers 4

You want to do this:

select * from 
(
    SELECT id, 2 as ordered FROM a -- returns 1,4,2,3
    UNION
    SELECT id, 1 as ordered FROM b -- returns 2,1
)
order by ordered

Update

I noticed that even though you have two different tables, you join the IDs, that means, if you have 1 in both tables, you are getting only one occurrence. If that's the desired behavior, you should stick to UNION. If not, change to UNION ALL.

So I also notice that if you change to the code I proposed, You would start getting both 1 and 2 (from both a and b). In that case, you might want to change the proposed code to:

select distinct id from 
(
    SELECT id, 2 as ordered FROM a -- returns 1,4,2,3
    UNION
    SELECT id, 1 as ordered FROM b -- returns 2,1
)
order by ordered
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+1 And you could omit the column alias in the second part of the union –  Andomar May 17 '11 at 20:39
    
Yes, I know. But in SO you have to be fast :) –  Adrian Carneiro May 17 '11 at 20:40
    
It was fast and perfect! Thank man! –  Topera May 17 '11 at 20:48
    
Ups! Not so perfect: I'm getting duplicated results...and distinct is not working... –  Topera May 17 '11 at 20:55
    
There's an update in the answer, you should take a look... –  Adrian Carneiro May 17 '11 at 21:12
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Using @Adrian tips, I found a solution:

I'm using GROUP BY and COUNT. I tried to use DISTINCT with ORDER BY but I'm getting error message: "not a SELECTed expression"

select id from 
(
    SELECT id FROM a -- returns 1,4,2,3
    UNION ALL -- changed to ALL
    SELECT id FROM b -- returns 2,1
)
GROUP BY id ORDER BY count(id);

Thanks Adrian and this blog.

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If you want the "b" rows first, don't you want COUNT(id) DESC? Also, this only works if "b" is a subset of the records in "a". Finally, you can't rely on the records from "b" or "a" being ordered in any particular way, given this particular example. When I tried this, I got 1,2,4,3 for output. –  DCookie May 17 '11 at 22:18
    
a) Yes, in this example I need DESC (I forgot to put). But in my app I need then in the end of table. b) no problem, in my app, table b is a subset of a. c) OK, doesn't matter in which order cames in originals selects. Count does the job :) –  Topera May 17 '11 at 22:31
    
You're good to go then ;-) I figured you were getting the answer you needed, I mainly wanted to point out to others some things to be aware of in this solution. I think the use of COUNT here is slick. –  DCookie May 17 '11 at 22:48
    
@DCookie Ok, thanks! –  Topera May 18 '11 at 13:30
    
This solution will not work if table B contains values that are not in table A. –  Allan May 19 '11 at 14:00
SELECT id, 1 AS sort_order
  FROM b
UNION
SELECT id, 2 AS sort_order
  FROM a
MINUS
SELECT id, 2 AS sort_order
  FROM b
ORDER BY 2;
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@Adrian's answer is perfectly suitable, I just wanted to share another way of achieving the same result:

select nvl(a.id, b.id)
from a full outer join b on a.id = b.id
order by b.id;
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