Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've using the examples from MSDN and (mostly) CodeProject to write a socket server. I'm trying to get my head around the thread-safety of the code. All socket events trigger the IO_Completed method which inspects the SAEA for last operation type (send or receive):

void IO_Completed(object sender, SocketAsyncEventArgs e)
{
    // determine which type of operation just completed and call the associated handler
    switch (e.LastOperation)
    {
        case SocketAsyncOperation.Receive:
            ProcessReceive(e);
            break;
        case SocketAsyncOperation.Send:
            ProcessSend(e);
            break;
        default:
            throw new ArgumentException("The last operation completed on the socket was not a receive or send");
    }       
}

Thinking about incoming calls, does ProcessReceive() need to be completely thread-safe as it may be called many times in a short timeframe if there are a lot of clients, or does it block somehow so that it fully completes before the next event calls it again? I am doing more than just bouncing the received message straight back to the client (which is what the examples do).

Even in the examples, ProcessReceive() is quite a long method (see below) and surely must be at risk of corruption from a second thread. By the time I add the code I need to do something sensible (call a WCF service) the chances of the same code being run again must be very high.

What do I need to do to make ProcessReceive() (and the other related methods) generally thread-safe without compromising the performance gained from using SocketAsyncEventArgs?

Example ProcessReceive() method below:

private void ProcessReceive(SocketAsyncEventArgs receiveSendEventArgs)
{
    DataHoldingUserToken receiveSendToken =
                 (DataHoldingUserToken)receiveSendEventArgs.UserToken;

    if (receiveSendEventArgs.SocketError != SocketError.Success)
    {
        receiveSendToken.Reset();
        CloseClientSocket(receiveSendEventArgs);
        return;
    }

    if (receiveSendEventArgs.BytesTransferred == 0)
    {
        receiveSendToken.Reset();
        CloseClientSocket(receiveSendEventArgs);
        return;
    }

    Int32 remainingBytesToProcess = receiveSendEventArgs.BytesTransferred;

    if (receiveSendToken.receivedPrefixBytesDoneCount <
                       this.socketListenerSettings.ReceivePrefixLength)
    {
        remainingBytesToProcess = prefixHandler.HandlePrefix(receiveSendEventArgs,
                  receiveSendToken, remainingBytesToProcess);

        if (remainingBytesToProcess == 0)
        {
            StartReceive(receiveSendEventArgs);
            return;
        }
    }

    bool incomingTcpMessageIsReady = messageHandler
              .HandleMessage(receiveSendEventArgs,
              receiveSendToken, remainingBytesToProcess);

    if (incomingTcpMessageIsReady == true)
    {
        receiveSendToken.theMediator.HandleData(receiveSendToken.theDataHolder);
        receiveSendToken.CreateNewDataHolder();
        receiveSendToken.Reset();
        receiveSendToken.theMediator.PrepareOutgoingData();
        StartSend(receiveSendToken.theMediator.GiveBack());
    }
    else
    {
        receiveSendToken.receiveMessageOffset = receiveSendToken.bufferOffsetReceive;
        receiveSendToken.recPrefixBytesDoneThisOp = 0;
        StartReceive(receiveSendEventArgs);
    }
}
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Just synchronize what needs to be synchronized. The IO_Completed method itself is threadsafe-agnostic and does not need to change.

Assuming that your DataHoldingUserToken (and other variables such as prefixHandler) are not threadsafe, then they'll need to be protected. As far as I can tell, a simple lock should do.

The mental model is this: IO_Completed may be called at any time with different arguments; each of these run on a ThreadPool thread.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, that helps clear the fog a bit! –  Alan May 18 '11 at 11:36
    
could you provide a resource that specifically says the Completed event is done on a thread from the ThreadPool? –  harrydev Jul 2 '13 at 20:01
    
@harrydev: I couldn't find one, but SAEA is essentially just a different way of doing Begin/End, which invokes its callbacks on a thread pool thread. –  Stephen Cleary Jul 2 '13 at 20:21
    
Yeah, the only issue I have is the I/O completion ports in native is designed as being something done on the same thread, with the thread going to an alertable state. This ensures minimal thread context switching etc. and no need for thread synchronization etc. I was hoping it would work the same way, anyway a test can show if this is the case. –  harrydev Jul 3 '13 at 7:27

I recently implemented something like this. It processed messages over tcp connections. I created a single thread that was responsible for accepting incoming connections. That thread would then spawn a new thread to handle each connection. Those threads blocked while waiting on I/O from the network so they didn't eat CPU resources. If your connections don't share anything it doesn't require thread safety.

share|improve this answer
    
Whilst it's true that this can be easier from a thread safety point of view; though that's not guaranteed, it's far less scalable than the overlapped i/o version. Those threads may not eat CPU but they use space for their stacks and cost CPU time when you context switch from one to another. –  Len Holgate May 18 '11 at 7:25

I'd recommend using the Asynchronous Programming Model, basically the clients would call on BeginProcessReceive and pass in a callback, and in the callback execute EndProcessReceive. You can use either tasks or if pre-4.0 call ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem. Am guessing here, but it looks like StartReceived or StartSend are blocking methods, that could be executed into their own (thread-pool) thread. Calling a WCF service, as you mentioned, would lend itself to this model.

This model, would allow you to handle a large number of clients, in addition to various other advantages...

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.