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We have a WCF service running on a remote server. It runs as a Windows Service, not hosted in IIS. We can hit this WCF service from our WinForms and WFP apps without any problem. However, when we attempt to hit it from a Silverlight 4 app, we get the following error:

An error occurred while trying to make a request to URI 'http://111.111.111.111/8484/Psn'. This could be due to attempting to access a service in a cross-domain way without a proper cross-domain policy in place, or a policy that is unsuitable for SOAP services. You may need to contact the owner of the service to publish a cross-domain policy file and to ensure it allows SOAP-related HTTP headers to be sent. This error may also be caused by using internal types in the web service proxy without using the InternalsVisibleToAttribute attribute. Please see the inner exception for more details.

Could someone put this into English and explain what I might be able to do to satisfy Silverlight?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The first thing to check is that you have a clientaccesspolicy.xml file or crossdomain.xml file on the WCF service host. Either of these files can be used to control which domains have access to your service. Without them no one has any access from Silverlight. These files live in the root of the WCF service host:

If, for example, the service is hosted in http://fabrikam.com then the file must be located at http://fabrikam.com/clientaccesspolicy.xml ... [or] ... http://fabrikam.com/crossdomain.xml.

The following clientaccesspolicy.xml file will allow access from http://www.example.com but block it from everywhere else:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<access-policy>
  <cross-domain-access>
    <policy>
      <allow-from http-request-headers="SOAPAction">
        <domain uri="http://www.example.com"/>
      </allow-from>
      <grant-to>
        <resource path="/" include-subpaths="true"/>
      </grant-to>
    </policy>
  </cross-domain-access>
</access-policy>

A similar crossdomain.xml file would be:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<!DOCTYPE cross-domain-policy SYSTEM "http://www.macromedia.com/xml/dtds/cross-domain-policy.dtd">
<cross-domain-policy>
  <allow-http-request-headers-from domain="http://www.example.com" headers="SOAPAction,Content-Type"/>
</cross-domain-policy>

Source

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Thank you. Two questions. Where exactly would I put this file? And what if I don't know (or care) what URLs to allow access? We'll have clients from all over the country hitting this WCF service. There is no way we'll know all the URLs. –  Hosea146 May 17 '11 at 21:04
    
@Hosea146 - you put the file in the root of the service. You can also use wildcards for the domain if you want to allow public access. –  ChrisF May 17 '11 at 21:06
    
Our WCF service is installed in C:\Program Files\Windows\PsnService. So would the file go there? Also, can you give me an example of a domain using wildcards? I'm not sure of the format I need. –  Hosea146 May 17 '11 at 21:15
    
@Hosea146 - assuming you've given me the local path on the server, then yes it goes there. As for wildcards <domain uri="*"/> would let everyone in. –  ChrisF May 17 '11 at 21:17
    
Yes that is the local path on the server. I'll try it, thank you! –  Hosea146 May 17 '11 at 21:18

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