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Let's make this simple... Suppose I have 2 entities:

 Application
   Id: int (primary key, autoincrement)
   Name: string(60)
   Client: User
   SupportEngineer: User

 User
  Id: int (primary key, autoincrement)
  Name: string(60)
  EmailAddress: string(60)

Suppose also I have a method named Create that is receiving an instance of Application created (in another layer) without the Context beign involved:

   var application = new Application
       {
          Name = "Visual Studio 2010",
          Client = new User { Id = 12 },
          SupportEngineer = new User { Id = 14 }
       };

Note that User with Id == 12 and == 14 exists in the database!!

  public void Create(Application application) {
    application.Client = Context.Users.FirstOrDefault(e => e.Id == application.Client.Id);
    application.SupportEngineer = Context.Users.FirstOrDefault(e => e.Id == application.SupportEngineer.Id);
    Context.Applications.AddObject(application);
    Context.SaveChanges();
  }

When I inspect the objects in the Context before the call to SaveChanges, I get the User objects created before calling the Create method as "added".

Why that is happening if I'm overriding the values of the properties Client and SupportEngineer with objects from the database? Why the mannually created objects (new User { Id = 12 }, new User { Id = 14 }) are still around, moreover in the context with "added" state?

share|improve this question
    
What's the real problem here? Is the state of Application invalid after the Create call? –  Sander Rijken May 17 '11 at 21:22
    
The real problem is that EF will try to create/insert two new users which is not the desired behaivor –  Michel Fornaris May 17 '11 at 21:56
    
What states do you see before you call AddObject? –  Ladislav Mrnka May 17 '11 at 22:02
    
objects created outside the context are kept around in added state –  Michel Fornaris May 17 '11 at 22:29

1 Answer 1

Just do this:

var application = new Application
   {
      Name = "Visual Studio 2010",
      ClientId = 12,
      SupportEngineerId = 14
   };

And have the Create method just create the object:

public void Create(Application application) {
    Context.Applications.AddObject(application);
    Context.SaveChanges();
}

Not a direct answer but some general advise:

Another thing you might want to watch out for, it looks as if you're reusing your DbContext. This is generally a bad idea, especially when adding/deleting objects. For example after a delete, the deleted objects are still known by the context. Instead I'd recommend a pattern like:

using(var ctx = new MyContext())
{
    ctx.Applications.Add(application);
    ctx.SaveChanges();
}
share|improve this answer
    
I don't have those properties (ClientId, SupportEngineerId) since my model was generated without including foreign keys as part of the model. –  Michel Fornaris May 17 '11 at 21:55
    
Even though this behavior happens with code generated out of the box, I was using POCOs generated by plugin "ADO.NET POCO Entity Generator" and setting ctx.ContextOptions.ProxyCreationEnabled = false solved the issue I was having –  Michel Fornaris May 17 '11 at 23:49
    
ctx.ContextOptions.ProxyCreationEnabled = false creates other issues that I did not have in the first place. –  Michel Fornaris May 18 '11 at 15:24
    
I'm in back to court zero again –  Michel Fornaris May 18 '11 at 15:25

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