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So I have a base class that has many children. This base class defines some readonly properties and variables that have default values. These can be different, depending on the child.

Readonly properties/fields allow you to change the value of the variable inside the constructor and also the definition, but nowhere else. I get a 'readonly variable can only be assigned to in a constructor' error if I try to change the value of an inherited readonly variable in the child class' constructor. Why is this and how can I work around this, without Reflection?

My intention: To allow user extensibility through scripts where they can only change certain fields once.

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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Adam has the right answer. If you're worried about the space it will take up (number of parameters in the constructor?) then you should address that as a different problem with a different solution: create a BaseConfig class, that contains all those properties and that is all that needs to be passed in. Base can then either assign all it's readonly fields from BaseConfig's properties, or you can instead have Base hold just one readonly field of type BaseConfig and refer to that for the values.

As to why this is, see C# constructor execution order regarding when each class's readonly fields would be initialized/initializable.

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This makes me a little sad; I was hoping for a really nice way of implementing this, so that making scripts for my engine would be really neat and clever. Oh well. A BaseConfig class will work just as well, thanks! –  Ruirize May 18 '11 at 6:34
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You could make a protected constructor in the base that takes a parameter for the readonly property.

An example:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Base b = new Child();
            Console.WriteLine(b.i);
            Console.Read();
        }
    }

    class Base
    {
        public readonly int i;

        public Base()
        {
            i = 42;
        }

        protected Base(int newI)
        {
            i = newI;
        }
    }

    class Child : Base
    {
        public Child()
            : base(43)
        {}
    }
}
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Problem: I have about 10 properties, that can all be different, with not all of them getting changed. –  Ruirize May 18 '11 at 5:39
    
So this would take up huge amounts of space :/ –  Ruirize May 18 '11 at 5:54
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You could get the exact behavior you are looking for by using virtual get only properties.

public class BSE
{
    virtual public int Prop 
    {
        get
        {
            return 6;
         }
     }
}
public class Derived : BSE
{
    public override int Prop
    {
         get
         {
             return 10;
         }
    }
 }

Fields are out side the inheritance and overloading model and should not be used to provide polymorphic features.

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This sounds more like it; but it is still a rather large jump from the clean public readonly int number = 5. –  Ruirize May 18 '11 at 5:41
    
@Ruirize You're assigning a constant to a readonly field? That really sounds like an abuse of readonly fields and that you might want to use virtual properties instead. –  CodesInChaos May 18 '11 at 6:27
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this is impossible by design. try passing the values to a protected base class constructor

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My intention was to allow users to script using this base class to extend my game. Using protected will still allow them to change the values of this field. Which is why readonly would have been a rather elegant solution for this, as I could allow them to change the values, but never change them once set. I should have made this clear in the question. –  Ruirize May 18 '11 at 5:42
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