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Just came across a rather confusing exam question, and my lecturer is away on holidays, so I come to StackOverflow begging for help!

The question is as follows :

"Joe has his own JoeConnection class for making connections between his computer and other computers. The class provides the following constructor and instance methods :

JoeConnection( String address ): Make a connection with the URL address.
void writeLn( String text ) : Write text to the JoeConnection.
String readLn( ): Read a line of text from the JoeConnection.
void clode( ) : Close the JoeConnection.

Joe's connections regularly fail and this causes errors. Using proper exception handling, demonstrate how to use Joe's JoeConnection class to

  1. make a JoeConnection with the URL http://students.chat.box
  2. write "Hello world" to the JoeConnection
  3. read in a string from the JoeConnection
  4. close the connection.

The connection handling should provide as man details as possible about the cause of failure and print the stack trace which led to the failure.

I have no idea how to tackle this, but I assume it is something similar to this :

public class Test {
    try { 
        JoeConnection connection = new JoeConnection(http://students.chat.box); 
    } catch {
        connectionError e; printStacktrace();}
    }
}

Can anyone please help me figure this out? Thanks a lot.

share|improve this question
    
Not sure I understand. Are you asking for help with your exam? – Nathan Ryan May 17 '11 at 22:56
    
Is this for a take-home exam? I don't think what you're doing is academically honest then. It's a different matter if this is for an exam that you've already been graded on, and you're just asking for clarification. – Vivin Paliath May 17 '11 at 22:59
    
No, this is a question which was asked on an exam paper from years ago. I do not sit the exam for a few days and was hoping to learn how to tackle similar questions between now and then. – John Curtsy May 17 '11 at 23:02

Without an indication of what exceptions are thrown and why, the only proper exception handling is no handling at all. Don't catch an exception if you don't know how to fix the problem that triggered it.

But the further instructions in your assignment introduce a different notion of "proper." You're supposed to print a stack trace. So catch the exception and print a stack trace. You were on the right track, but your syntax was wrong. Refer back to your textbook and lecture notes to remind yourself what the syntax is for catching exceptions (and for passing strings to functions, for that matter).

try {
  JoeConnection connection = new JoeConnection("http://students.chat.box");
  connection.writeLn("Hello world");
  // etc
} catch (Exception e) {
  e.printStackTrace();
}
share|improve this answer

"Proper exception handling" is a little vague. I agree with @Rob Kennedy's statement that no exception handling is appropriate unless you know why the exception is thrown and what should be done with it. Otherwise, the exception should be allowed to propagate. So, for example:

void foo(String address) throws JoeException {
    JoeConnection connection = new JoeConnection(address);
    try {
        connection.writeLn("Hello World!");
    } finally {
        // Ensure the connection is closed when finished.
        // This happens whether an exception occurs or not.
        connection.close();
    }
}

If you wanted to catch the exception just to print it, you could do something like this:

void foo(String address) throws JoeException {
    try {
        JoeConnection connection = new JoeConnection(address);
        try {
            connection.writeLn("Hello World!");
        } finally {
            connection.close();
        }
    } catch (JoeException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
        // Don't know what to do about this; rethrow.
        throw e;
    }
}

There is a subtlety here that even experience Java programmers can miss, though. If an exception occurs while creating the connection, it doesn't need to be closed. If an exception occurs while writing to the connection, it does need to be closed; thus the finally clause. However, the act of closing can also throw an exception. If closing the connection throws an exception, only that exception will be thrown by the try statement. If the finally clause was reached as a result of the writeLn operation throwing an exception, the exception of the writeLn call will be effectively ignored. This is probably not what you want.

Instead, we can try something ugly like this:

void foo(String address) throws JoeException {
    try {
        JoeConnection connection = new JoeConnection(address);
        boolean normalCompletion = false;
        try {
            connection.writeLn("Hello World!");
            normalCompletion = true;
        } finally {
            if (normalCompletion) {
                // The writeLn operation completed normally.
                // Propagate an exception thrown by the close operation.
                connection.close();
            } else {
                // The writeLn operation completed abruptly.
                // Ignore an exception thrown by the close operation.
                try {
                    connection.close();
                } catch (JoeException e) {
                    /* empty */
                }
            }
        }
    } catch (JoeException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
        // Don't know what to do about this; rethrow.
        throw e;
    }
}

This looks (and is) syntactically hideous, but it does show "proper" exception handling of a sort. The language enhancement from Project Coin should clean this up a bit.

share|improve this answer
    
Wanted to upvote this for your separation of try-finally and try-catch, but couldn't because of the use of log and rethrow. Either log or rethrow, not both. – ILMTitan May 18 '11 at 19:36
    
@ILMTitan: Thanks for the upvote suggestion, and agreed about log or rethrow (as a matter of best practice in the general case). However, the "logging" here was due to the requirement of printing the stack trace in the original question; it was combined with the rethrow because not catching the exception is the appropriate way to "handle" an exception if you don't know why it was thrown or what to do about it. – Nathan Ryan May 19 '11 at 8:02

For starters, I can help you out with the syntax of what you wrote:

try {
    JoeConnection connection = new JoeConnection("http://students.chat.box");
}
catch (JoeConnectionException e) {
    e.printStacktrace();
}

I took the liberty of changing the linebreaks and renaming 'connectionError' as JoeConnectionException which looks more conventional to me.

You'll have to do something similar for the readLn, writeLn, and close method calls since it said that the connection regularly fails (i.e. not just while connecting).

Cheers, good luck.

share|improve this answer

Catching an exception should look like:

try {
    JoeConnection conn = new JoeConnection(url);
} catch (YourExceptionClassNameHere e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}

Also: if you want to use a literal String, make sure you include the quotations. (It should be "http://students.chat.box".)

share|improve this answer

It's good to have a finally as well:

public class Test {

    try { 
        JoeConnection connection = new JoeConnection(http://students.chat.box); 
    } 

    catch(Exception e) {
        e.printStacktrace();
    }

    finally {
       if(connection != null) {
          connection.close();
       }
    }
}

Typically you handle exceptions if you know what to do with them (this involves error-recovery logic or wrapping an exception and throwing it to a higher level).

Assuming that each method throws an exception, you could do something like this for "maximum detail":

public class Test {

    JoeConnection connection = null;

    try {
       connection = new JoeConnection("http://students.chat.box");  
       ...
       ...           
    } 

    catch(OpenException e) {
       System.out.println("Error while opening connection");
       e.printStacktrace();
    }    

    catch(WriteException e) {
       System.out.println("Error while writing to connection");
       e.printStacktrace();
    }

    catch(ReadException e) {
       System.out.println("Error while reading from connection");
       e.printStacktrace();
    }

    finally {
       if(connection != null) {
          connection.close();
       }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
connection is out of scope in your finally blocks; it will result in a compiler error – Nathan Ryan May 17 '11 at 23:04
    
Oops. Will fix. I forgot to pull it out of the try. – Vivin Paliath May 17 '11 at 23:05

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