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I have a method that reads text from a file; decompression may be required, depending on an input parameter:

public static String readText(File inFile, boolean compressed) {
    InputStream in = null;
    InputStreamReader isr = null;
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();//constant resizing is costly, so set the STRING_SIZE
    try {
        in = new FileInputStream(inFile);
        if (compressed) {
            in = new GZIPInputStream(in);
        }
        isr = new InputStreamReader(in);
        int length = 0;
        char[] cbuf = new char[8 * 1024];
        while ((length = isr.read(cbuf)) != -1) {
            sb.append(cbuf, 0, length);
        }
    } catch (Exception e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    } finally {
        try {
            in.close();
        } catch (Exception e1) {
            e1.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
    return sb.toString();
}

It was suggested that I use InputStream like this so it is easier to write, and so that in the end I only have to close one thing. I am still a bit worried this might cause a memory leak. So my question is: does anyone knows if the code above is OK? Or do I have to get back to a dozen of streams and close them one by one in a finally block?

Thanks a lot.

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(If your file opening fails the in.close(); will NPE and execute the no particularly helpful error handling. Write resource acquisition and releas as acquire(); try { use(); } finally { release(); }, or use the Java SE 7 resource block feature.) –  Tom Hawtin - tackline May 17 '11 at 23:34
    
Java 7 resource blocks are/will-be sweet! –  karmakaze May 17 '11 at 23:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Yes, closing the outermost stream/reader is sufficient.

However, your code has another potential bug: new InputStreamReader(in) will use the platform default encoding, which depends on the OS region/language settings. You should specify the encoding of the text file and use it explicitly in the constructor.

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@user685275: To clarify, you should close 'isr', not 'in'. –  EJP May 18 '11 at 1:44
    
This is great, thanks –  user685275 May 19 '11 at 5:32

Here's one point to add: see if 'in' is null before calling 'in.close()' as the exception could happen without the first assignment succeeding.

Also, it's good form to only catch possible exceptions (e.g. IOException). That way if you add more code and the IDE tells you that a new exception type isn't handled you can add the proper specific code rather than never hearing about it because the catch (Exception ) which was originally for IOException is also (mishandling?) every other type.

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+1 to compensate for gratuitous downvote. Both points are valid. (And allowing an NPE to happen and catching it is sloppy.) –  Stephen C May 17 '11 at 23:33
    
This is great, thanks –  user685275 May 19 '11 at 5:33
    
You're welcome @user685275. –  karmakaze May 19 '11 at 7:33

Here's the clean Java 7 way which works for anything that implements AutoCloseable/Closeable:

try (InputStream in = compressed ?
                        new GZIPInputStream(new FileInputStream(inFile))
                      : new FileInputStream(inFile);
     InputStreamReader isr = new InputStreamReader(in))
{
    int length = 0;
    char[] cbuf = new char[8 * 1024];
    while ((length = isr.read(cbuf)) != -1) {
        sb.append(cbuf, 0, length);
    }
}
catch (Exception e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}

If you're wondering what happens if there's an exception while closing the resource, read about getSuppressedExceptions() which was also added.

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