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Perl is continuing to surprise me. I have a code which takes an input from the command line and checks if it is in a file. I have a file like this:

ls

date

pwd

touch

rm

First i read this file as

open(MYDATA,"filename") or die "Can not open file\n";
@commandlist = <MYDATA>;
chomp @commandlist;
close MYDATA;

the argument is in $commandname variable. To check if it is correct i printed to screen.

print $commandname."\n";

it works well. then i write the code.

$count = @commandlist;
for($i=0;$i < $count;$i++)
{
    print $commandname;
    print $commandlist[$i];
    print "\n";
    if($commandname eq $commandlist[$i])
    {
        print "equal\n";
    }
}

and it does not print 'equal'. but it should do becaues $commandname variable has the value 'ls' which is in the file. i also print the value of $commandname and $commandlist[$i] to see if "visibly" they are equal and i get the output:

ls
lsls
lsdate
lspwd
lstouch
lsrm

here i see that they got the same value but why never eq operator evaluates to zero. Additionally to get this task done, I have tried various methods all of which come to be useless like making a hash from the array and using exists. I am struggling for this seemingly easy problem for a day but i just dont get it. Thanks in advance

EDIT: when i change the above loop as below

$count = @commandlist;
for($i=0;$i < $count;$i++)
{
    print $commandlist[$i];
    print $commandname;
    print "\n";
    if($commandname eq $commandlist[$i])
    {
        print "equal\n";
    }
}

I got an output like.

ls
ls
lste
lsd
lsuch
ls

it seems like for some reason it overwrites some characters.

EDIT:

my whole script is like:

#reading file code, i posted above
while(<>)
chomp($_);
$commandname = $_;
if($commandname eq "start"){
##something here
} elsif ($commandname eq "machines"){
##something here
} else {

    $count = @commandlist;
    for($i=0;$i < $count;$i++)
    {
        print $commandlist[$i];
        print $commandname;
        print "\n";
        if($commandname eq $commandlist[$i])
        {
            print "equal\n";
        }
    }

}
share|improve this question
4  
Can you print the variables wrapped in some tags (such as print "--$commandname--\n"; or print "--" . $commandlist[$i] . "--\n"; to see if there isn't any whitespace / crlf which is in the variables? –  carlosfigueira May 17 '11 at 23:44
    
i did not try that but i know that there arent any white spaces because the output i get i also posted above. –  bahti May 18 '11 at 0:20
    
"when i change the loop as below" That loop looks identical to the one above. Use print "cmd: ($commandname)\n" to see exactly which print belongs to which data, and exactly what characters are in it. –  TLP May 18 '11 at 0:38
    
The reason characters appear to be overwritten is because the lines in your text file are delimited with carriage-return+linefeed, rather than just linefeed. Obviously you're running your script on a Windows machine with a possibly misconfigured version of Perl. To fix, you'll need to $commandlist[$i]=~s/\r?\n$//; before you compare. –  Rob Raisch May 18 '11 at 1:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

A bit change in the code would result in what you are looking for, "chomp" the string from array before you put it for comparison. Here it is

chomp $commandlist[$i];

if($commandname eq $commandlist[$i])
{
    print "equal\n";
}

EDIT: as per perldoc chomp when you are chomping a list you should parenthesis. So, in your case ... instead simply saying

chomp @commandlist 

make it like

chomp(@commandlist)

FINAL EDIT: I tried this and worked fine. Give it a try

$commandname = $ARGV[0];

open(MYDATA,"chk.txt") or die "Can not open file\n"; 
@commandlist = <MYDATA>; 
chomp(@commandlist);
close MYDATA; 

print $commandname."\n"; 

$count = @commandlist;
print $commandname; 
for($i=0;$i < $count;$i++) 
 {

 print $commandlist[$i]; 
 print "\n"; 
 if($commandname eq $commandlist[$i]) 
 {   
  print "equal\n";   
 } 
 }
share|improve this answer
1  
chomp works on an array as well: perldoc.perl.org/functions/chomp.html –  stevecomrie May 17 '11 at 23:46
    
i tried but it did not make any changes. –  bahti May 18 '11 at 0:09
    
@user756790, I tried it in my machine and it did worked. Also, not sure from where you are reading the $commandname scalar (from file or through user input) ... trying chomping $commandname as well before you do the comparison. That might solve. –  Rahul May 18 '11 at 0:18
    
@Rahul i read it from command line and chomp it as well. –  bahti May 18 '11 at 0:27
    
@user756, see final edit. issue is with chomping command line input. hope this helps –  Rahul May 18 '11 at 0:35

You might consider restructuring your code as:

my $path='filename';
my $match='ls';

part 1 - read the file

open(my $fh, '<', $path) or die "failed to open $path: $!";
my @commandlist=<$fh>;
chomp @commandlist;  
# or you can combine these lines as: 
#    chomp(my @commandlist=<$fh>);
# because chomp operates on the array itself rather than making a copy.
close($fh);

or

use File::Slurp qw/ read_file /; 
# see http://search.cpan.org/dist/File-Slurp/lib/File/Slurp.pm

my @commandlist=read_file($path);  # result is pre-chomped!

part 2 - check for a match

foreach my $command (@commandlist) {
  print "$match equals $command\n" if $match eq $command;
}

One important consideration is that each line in your file must contain only the command name and cannot begin or end with any spaces or tabs. To compensate for possible leading or trailing whitespace, try:

foreach my $command (@commandlist) {
  $command=~s/^\s+|\s+$//g; # strip leading or trailing whitespace
  print "$match equals $command\n" if $match eq $command;
}

And finally, always start your Perl script with a Perl developer's bestest friends:

use strict;
use warnings;

which will catch most (if not all) errors caused by sloppy programming practice. (We all suffer from this!)

share|improve this answer
    
If you don't have File::Slurp on your computer (assuming it's a Linux machine), you can type: 'cpan File::Slurp' at the command prompt to retrieve and load it. For Windows, use the ActiveState Perl Package Manager. –  Rob Raisch May 17 '11 at 23:55
    
The three-argument version of open() is preferred because it reduces the possibility of unexpected side-effects for odd file names. –  Rob Raisch May 17 '11 at 23:57
    
Finally, the s operator with the regular expression: s/^\s+|\s+$//g will globally match any whitespace at the beginning (^) or end ($) of a line and remove it. –  Rob Raisch May 18 '11 at 0:00
    
my input file is well formatted i mean as i expect it to be. once i get the code work i would consider using regexps to make it more reliable. Also do the above file reading methods have different from what i use? because from the output i posted i know it read ok. İs it possible that some other part of the program causing the issue, because i have some while loops and if elsif checks before coming to that part. –  bahti May 18 '11 at 0:15

The overwritting indicates the presence of a CR. The lines end with CR LF, but you only remove the LF with chomp. Change

while (<>) {
    chomp($_)

to

while (<>) {
    s/\s+\z//;
share|improve this answer

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