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try
    {
        using (response = (HttpWebResponse)request.GetResponse())
            // Exception is not caught by outer try!
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        // Log
    }

EDIT:

// Code for binding IP address:
ServicePoint servicePoint = ServicePointManager.FindServicePoint(uri);
servicePoint.BindIPEndPointDelegate = new BindIPEndPoint(Bind);
//
private IPEndPoint Bind(ServicePoint servicePoint, IPEndPoint remoteEndPoint, int retryCount)
    {
        IPAddress address;

        if (retryCount < 3)
            address = IPAddress.Parse("IPAddressHere");
        else
            {
                address = IPAddress.Any;
                throw new Exception("IP is not available,"); // This exception is not caught
            }

        return new IPEndPoint(address, 0);
    }
share|improve this question
8  
That is not true. –  SLaks May 18 '11 at 2:37
    
So are you saying that the exception is "swallowed", or the exception bubbles out of the catch clause? –  RQDQ May 18 '11 at 2:40
    
In visual studio it doesn't work. If exception occurs it says an unhandled exception occurred. But when running outside of visual studio everything is OK. Note: A delegate call is triggered inside using which will cause the exception. –  Xaqron May 18 '11 at 2:51
    
post a code snippet that demonstrates the problem. –  Anthony Pegram May 18 '11 at 2:57
    
In my answer below, I have cited a scenario wherein an unhandled exception can occur. Let me know if that's the case for you. In general, you should handle async methods within the using block. Otherwise, the outer catch block will not handle it for you. And yes, VS will let you know of any unhandled exceptions. –  Alex R. May 18 '11 at 2:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I could imagine this can happen if you are creating a separate thread within the using block. If an exception is thrown there, be sure to handle it there as well. Otherwise, the outer catch block in this case won't be able to handle it.

class TestClass : IDisposable
{
    public void GetTest()
    {
        throw new Exception("Something bad happened"); // handle this
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
    }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        try
        {
            using (TestClass t = new TestClass())
            {
                Thread ts = new Thread(new ThreadStart(t.GetTest));
                ts.Start();
            }
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Error: " + ex.Message);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Perhaps. It seems binding an IP address with IPEndPoint causes the callback to be run on another thread which I don't have control over. If the IP is not availabe and exception occurs, although the caller is inside a try/catch, exception is treated as unhandled. –  Xaqron May 18 '11 at 2:58
1  
Yes, the callback needs proper handling then. –  Alex R. May 18 '11 at 3:19

The using keyword is the same as try-catch-finally, http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/yh598w02.aspx. Basically, you have a try-catch-finally nested inside of a try-catch which is why you're probably so confused.

You could just do this instead...

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        HttpWebResponse response = new HttpWebResponse();
        try
        {
            response.GetResponse();
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            //do something with the exception
        }
        finally
        {
            response.Dispose();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

This works fine. You'll see an exception getting printed by the Console.WriteLine()

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Foo foo = new Foo();

        try
        {
            using (Bar bar = foo.CreateBar())
            {

            }
        }
        catch(Exception exception)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(exception.Message);
        }
    }
}

public class Foo
{
    public Bar CreateBar()
    {
        throw new ApplicationException("Something went wrong.");
    }
}

public class Bar : IDisposable
{
    public void Dispose()
    {
    }
}

And if you meant that the exception gets thrown inside the using, this works fine to. This will also generate a Console statement:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Foo foo = new Foo();

        try
        {
            using (Bar bar = foo.CreateBar())
            {
                throw new ApplicationException("Something wrong inside the using.");
            }
        }
        catch(Exception exception)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(exception.Message);
        }
    }
}

public class Foo
{
    public Bar CreateBar()
    {
        return new Bar();
        // throw new ApplicationException("Something went wrong.");
    }
}

public class Bar : IDisposable
{
    public void Dispose()
    {
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Do you have more code after the using? The using needs one statement or a block { } after the using statement. In the example below any exception inside the using statement will be caught with the try..catch block.

try
{
    using (response = (HttpWebResponse)request.GetResponse())
    {
        ....
    }
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
}
share|improve this answer

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