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I have a typed dataset for a table called People. When you call the update method of a table adapter and pass in the table, is it run as a transaction?

I'm concerned that at some point the constraints set in the xsd will pass but the database will reject this item for one reason or another. I want to make sure that the entire update is rejected and I'm not sure that it just accepts what it can until that error occurs.

If it runs as a transaction I have this

Auth_TestDataSetTableAdapters.PeopleTableAdapter tableAdapter = new Auth_TestDataSetTableAdapters.PeopleTableAdapter();
Auth_TestDataSet.PeopleDataTable table = tableAdapter.GetDataByID(1);

table.AddPeopleRow("Test Item", 5.015);
tableAdapter.Update(table);

But if I have to manually trap this in a transaction I wind up with this

Auth_TestDataSetTableAdapters.PeopleTableAdapter tableAdapter = new Auth_TestDataSetTableAdapters.PeopleTableAdapter();
Auth_TestDataSet.PeopleDataTable table = tableAdapter.GetDataByID(1);

tableAdapter.Connection.Open();
tableAdapter.Transaction = tableAdapter.Connection.BeginTransaction();

table.AddPeopleRow("Test Item", 5.015);

try
{
    tableAdapter.Update(table);
    tableAdapter.Transaction.Commit();
}
catch
{
    tableAdapter.Transaction.Rollback();
}
finally
{
    tableAdapter.Connection.Close();
}

Either way works but I am interested in the inner workings. Any other issues with the way I've decided to handle this type of row addition?

-- EDIT --

Determined that it does not work as a transaction and will commit however many records are successful until the error occurs. Thanks to the helpful post below a bit of that transactional code has been condensed to make controlling the transaction easier on the eyes:

Auth_TestDataSetTableAdapters.PeopleTableAdapter tableAdapter = new Auth_TestDataSetTableAdapters.PeopleTableAdapter();
Auth_TestDataSet.PeopleDataTable table = tableAdapter.GetDataByID(1);

try
{
    using (TransactionScope ts = new TransactionScope())
    {
        table.AddPeopleRow("Test Item", (decimal)5.015);
        table.AddPeopleRow("Test Item", (decimal)50.015);
        tableAdapter.Update(table);

        ts.Complete();
    }
}
catch (SqlException ex)
{ /* ... */ }
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your approach should work.

You can simplify it a little though:

using (TransactionScope ts = new TransactionScope())
{
     // your old code here
     ts.Complete();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Just realized why it wasn't working, 4.0 addition. Forgot to mention I was on 3.5 SP1. Good stuff though, just wish I could use it. –  Mohgeroth May 18 '11 at 3:05
    
@Mohgeroth - It is not new. It's been around since 2.0 - msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  Alex Aza May 18 '11 at 3:09
    
Now I see it, I had to add a reference manually. First search said 4.0 so I assumed, my bad. Awesome little piece to simplify all of this extra code! –  Mohgeroth May 18 '11 at 3:10

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