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I have read the directory with the files into an array. Now the problem is I would like to open the files and display their contents with a line in between them.

For example, I would like to open file1.txt and file2.txt, and display their contents like this:

Hello nice to meet you -- file 1

How are you? -- file 2

The code is :

sub openFile{
   opendir(fol, "folder/details");
   my @files= readdir(fol); 
   my @FilesSorted = sort(@files);
   foreach my $EachFile (@FilesSorted) {
      print $EachFile . "\n";
   } 
}
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6 Answers 6

If you just want to display all the lines in the files (as your code seems to be trying to do), without any indication of which line(s) came from which file, there's a trick involving the pre-defined variable @ARGV:

sub openFile {
    opendir(fol, "folder/details");
    @ARGV = sort(readdir(fol));
    close fol;
    while (<>) {
        print "$_\n";
    }
}

If you need to print the file names, you'll have to open each file explicitly:

sub openFile {
    opendir(fol, "folder/details");
    my @files = sort(readdir(fol));
    close fol;
    while ($file = shift @files) {
        open(FILE, $file);
        while (<FILE>) {
            print "$_\n";
        }
        close FILE;
    }
}
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1  
@ted-hopp Actually, the current file is available from $ARGV: perlvar(1): "$ARGV contains the name of the current file when reading from <>." –  DCharness May 18 '11 at 6:02
    
@DCharness The trick I suggested with @ARGV is described in the Perl docs: "You can modify @ARGV before the first <> as long as the array ends up containing the list of filenames you really want." There was no call for a downvote here. –  Ted Hopp May 18 '11 at 14:20
    
@ted-hopp No downvote intended: I was just trying to add that your suggestion of setting @ARGV was even more useful than you implied. "If you need to print the filenames" isn't strictly true, since the current file is in $ARGV in your first example, so something like print "$_ -- $ARGV\n" would label lines with filenames as in the question's sample output. Apologies if I'm still misunderstanding you. –  DCharness May 19 '11 at 18:17
    
@DCharness - it seems that I misunderstood you. Thanks for the comment and clarification. I guess the downvote was from someone else. –  Ted Hopp May 19 '11 at 18:20

Another example, with some error checking, and skipping sub dirs:

sub print_all_files {
  my $dir = shift;
  opendir(my $dh, $dir) || die "Can't read [$dir]: $!";
  while(defined(my $file = readdir $dh)) {
    next unless -f "$dir/$file"; # Ignore subdirs and . and ..
    open(my $fh, "<", "$dir/$file") || die "Can't read [$dir/$file]: $!";
    print while readline($fh);
    print "\n"; # add an extra line
  }
} 

print_all_files("folder/details");
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Try

sub openFile{
   opendir(fol, "folder/details");
   my @files= readdir(fol); 
   my @FilesSorted = sort(@files);
   foreach my $EachFile (@FilesSorted) {
      if($EachFile ne "." && $EachFile ne ".." && !(-d $EachFile)) { #important to skip the directories 
        open IT $EachFile || die "unable to read ".$EachFile."\n"; # open file
        while($line = <IT>) {  # print content in file
           print "$line\n";
        }
        close(IT); # close file
        print "-->$EachFile\n";  # print file name
   } 
}
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2  
open(my $it, '<', $EachFile) or die "same statement"; and iterate with while(defined(my $line = <$it>)) to avoid using global variables –  wespiserA May 18 '11 at 3:59

Can this be a stand-alone program?

#! /usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

die "$0: no arguments allowed\n" if @ARGV;

my $dir = "folder/details";
opendir my $dh, $dir or die "$0: opendir $dir: $!";

while (defined(my $file = readdir $dh)) {
  my $path = $dir . "/" . $file;
  push @ARGV, $path if -f $path;
}

@ARGV = sort @ARGV;
while (<>) {
  print;
}
continue {
  print "\n" if eof && @ARGV;
}

Notes

  • The defined check on each value returned from readdir is necessary to handle a file whose name is a false value in Perl, e.g., 0.
  • Your intent is to write the contents of the files in folder/details, so it's also necessary to filter for plain files with the -f test.
  • Perl's built-in processing in while (<>) { ... } shifts arguments off the front of @ARGV. The eofwithout parentheses!—test in the continue clause detects the end of each file and prints newlines as separators between files, not terminators.
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+1: The continue block may seem like overkill in a simple example like this (with only a print in the per-line loop body), but it's great practice for a more complex loop that might use a next to skip to the next line. In the loop over <>, that next line could come from another file, and the file-separating blank line still (probably) belongs in the output. –  DCharness May 19 '11 at 19:09

You can simplify the directory reading code by using a module like File::Util. It, or some other module like it, will provide several conveniences: error checking; filtering out unwanted directory contents (like the . and .. subdirs); selecting contents by type (for example, just files or dirs); and attaching the root path to the contents.

use strict;
use warnings;
use File::Util qw();

my $dir = 'folder/details';
my $file_util = File::Util->new;
my @files = $file_util->list_dir($dir, qw(--with-paths --no-fsdots --files-only));

for my $f (@files){
    local @ARGV = ($f);
    print while <>;
    print "\n";
}

If you prefer to avoid using other modules, you can get the file names like this:

opendir(my $dh, $dir) or die $!;
my @files = grep -f, map("$dir/$_", readdir $dh);
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Following up Greg Bacon's answer (re: "Can this be a stand-alone program?"), if you still want this in an openFile subroutine, you could use the same loop there:

sub openFile{
  opendir(fol, "folder/details");
  my @files= readdir(fol); 
  my @FilesSorted = sort(@files);
  local @ARGV = @FilesSorted;
  while (<>) {
    print;
  } 
  continue {
    print "\n" if eof && @ARGV;
  } 
}

Note use of local @ARGV (as in FMc's answer): this preserves any global argument list from outside the subroutine and restores that value on exit.

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