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I've noticed lately that sometimes the domready and window.load does not work. It's like randomly working when entering the page, and or refreshing.

Say I have:

$(function(){
  $('.hide').hide();
  // disable html5 native validation to let jquery handle 
  $('form').attr('novalidate','novalidate');
});

$(window).load(function(){
  $('.input').click(function(){
      $(this).animate({opacity:0.8});
  }).blur(function(){
      $(this).animate({opacity:1});
  });
});

Sometimes when I load the page, the element is not getting hidden, sometimes it is, the input fields will animate, sometimes not, and both don't necessary fail together. If I refresh the page a few times, it will work.

I always thought that domready will execute as soon as the doms are ready, and window.load will wait until everything on the page is rendered ready? Or is this more bugs from HTML5?

Question is: am I missing something or just misunderstanding something?

Edit: Notably Chromium. I am on Ubuntu, so I would not be surprised if it was a chromium bug.

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I know this doesn't answer your question but I don't know why you're using $(function(){... (domready) in one place and $(window).load... (window load) in other place. Couldn't you achieve the same thing with domready as you're not waiting for images to load? –  marcosfromero May 18 '11 at 3:16
    
What does blue do? Is it a custom jQuery function? –  marcosfromero May 18 '11 at 3:16
    
@marcosfromero: I do have images loading on some pages, but this was a simple sample to demonstrate my setup and if it was a problem with HTML5, or just chromium itself having that issue. Also, what are you talking about blue? I don't recall blue anywhere in my code. –  robx May 18 '11 at 3:22
3  
Why would it be bugs from HTML5? The only elements that reliably support the load event are body and iframe. jQuery hatches its own DOM ready event based on what it thinks is available. I wouldn't mix the two. In particular, don't depend on HTML5 - it is not a standard and support is mixed. Stick with HTML 4.01 and DOM 0/1/2/3 for important things. Use HTML5 features carefully, with feature testing and suitable fallback. Not everyone is using the latest Chrome browser or whatever. –  RobG May 18 '11 at 3:24
2  
@RobG: I guess you're right. I went and started to pluck extention's, and found that google voice plugin was messing with the domready and window.load. If the plugin is logged in, it tries to find phone numbers on the page interfering with jquery's domready. –  robx May 18 '11 at 3:40

1 Answer 1

Be aware that if you have a very complex html structure, it may delay the time for the dom to become ready. The browser probably tries to render the page as quickly as it possibly can, and with a really complex page, it's possible that the rendering will begin and the domready event will trigger, but the browser will quickly render stuff before the specific code that you set up gets triggered.

A block in jQuery domready happens as fast as it can, but if you put, say:

setTimeout(function(){ $().ready(function(){alert('finally');});}, 9000);

That "as fast as it can" is still going to be limited by where the code occurs, in this case after a 9 second timeout.

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