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I have a singleton class used to initialise error_handling.

The class as is takes a Zend_Config object and optional $appMode in parameter, to allow overriding the defined APPMODE constant when testing this class. All is fine if I create the object with non-static properties, but initialising a static property does not work the way I expected when calling the usual getInstance().

class ErrorHandling{

  private static $instance;
  private static $_appMode;  // not initialised in returned instance
  private $_errorConfig;

 private function __construct(Zend_Config $config, $appMode = null){

   $this->_errorConfig = $config;

   if(isset($appMode)){
       static::$_appMode = $appMode;
   }else{
         static::$_appMode = APPMODE;
   }  
 }

 private final function  __clone(){}

 public static function getInstance(Zend_config $config, $appMode = null){
     if(! (static::$instance instanceof self)){
         static::$instance = new static($config, $appMode);
     } 
     return static::$instance;
 }
}

Not that I really need $_appMode to be static at all, I declared it private and moved on, but I am still wondering if one can initialise static properties from a static function call. If I REALLY needed static $_appMode, I could probably create the object and set the value afterwards with a setter method but this doesn't "feel" as being the best way to do this.

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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Checkout

<?

class ErrorHandling{

  private static $instance;
  private static $_appMode;  // not initialised in returned instance
  private $_errorConfig;

 private function __construct(array $config, $appMode = null){

   $this->_errorConfig = $config;

   if(isset($appMode)){
       self::$_appMode = $appMode;
   }else{
         self::$_appMode = APPMODE;
   }  
 }

 private final function  __clone(){}

 public static function getInstance(array $config, $appMode = null){
     if(! (self::$instance instanceof self)){
         self::$instance = new ErrorHandling($config, $appMode);
     } 
     return self::$instance;
 }

 public static function getAppMode() {
    return self::$_appMode;
 }
} 

$e = ErrorHandling::getInstance(array('dev' => true), -255);
var_dump($e, ErrorHandling::getAppMode());

Is that your want?

Your could read here about difference between static and self- late static binding

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For some reason I could not set static properties on the singleton in the constructer. –  stefgosselin May 19 '11 at 5:23
    
@stefgosselin, I edited my answer. try it now –  azat May 19 '11 at 19:16
    
Thanks, I had not tried self::$instance = new ErrorHandling($config, $appMode); I believe I was using self::$instance = new self($config, $appMode); in original code. Also was using static:: for return values and apparently this keyword is only for assignment. Thanks for the feedback ;o) –  stefgosselin May 20 '11 at 3:34
1  
@stef static is ok for assignment in PHP >= 5.3; it gives slightly different behavior than self though. –  Slava May 20 '11 at 8:06
    
@stefgosselin, add link to difference between self and static –  azat May 20 '11 at 18:55
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Your example works fine for me (PHP 5.3.2). What version of PHP do you run? Does it give any errors? Is APPMODE constant defined?

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You probably don't use any 5.3.x-Version of PHP. "Late Static Binding" (static::$_appMode) is not available in any version before. Use self::$_appMode instead. Its slightly different from static, but in your case it should be OK. For further info read Manual: Late Static Binding

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