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I have a series of parser which parse the same basic sort of text for relevant data but they come from various sources so they differ subtltey. I am parsing millions of documents per day so any speed optimizations help.

Here is a simplified example to show the fundamental issue. The parser is set up such that there is a base abstract parser that actual parsers implement:

abstract class BaseParser
{
     protected abstract string SomeRegex { get; }

     public string ParseSomethingCool(string text)
     {
         return Regex.Match(text, SomeRegex).Value;
     }

     ....
 }

 class Parser1: BaseParser
 {
     protected override string SomeRegex { get { return "^.*"; } } // example regex

     ...
 }

 class Parser2: BaseParser
 {
     protected override string SomeRegex { get { return "^[0-9]+"; } } // example regex

     ...
 }

So my questions are:

  • If I were to make the things returned in the get constants would it speed things up?
  • Theoretically if it didn't use a property and everything was a straight up constant would that speed things up more?
  • What sort of speed increases if any could I see?
  • Am I just clutching at straws?
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2  
I dont know, but could you do some tests/profile the code? –  soandos May 18 '11 at 4:08

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I don't think converting the properties to constants will give you any appreciable performance boost. The Jit'ed code probably have those inlined anyway (since you put in constants).

I think the best approach is profiling your code first and see which parts have the most potential of optimization. My suggestion of things to look at:

  1. RegEx - as you already know, sometimes, a well constructed RegEx expression spells out the difference between fast and extremely slow. Its really a case to case basis, depending on the expression used and the text you feed it.
  2. Alternatives - I'm not sure what kind of matching you perform, but it might be worth considering other approaches especially if what you are trying to match is not that complex. Then benchmark the results.
  3. Other parts of your code - see where the bottle neck occurs. Is it in disk IO, or CPU? See if more threads will help or maybe revisit the function the reads the file contents.

Whatever you end up doing, its always a big help to measure. Identify the areas with opportunity, find a faster way to do it then measure again to verify if it is indeed faster.

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The things in the get already are constant.

I bet the jitter is already optimizing away the property accessors, so you probably won't see much performance gain by refactoring them out.

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I don't think you'd see appreciable speed improvements from this kind of optimsation. Your best bet, though, is to try it and benchmark the results.

One change that would make a difference is to not use Regex if you can get away without it. Regex is a pretty big and useful hammer, but not every nail needs a hammer that big.

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Do you know if .Contains or IndexOf in .NET are dumb or actual use smart algorithms (don't just scan every letter in sequence). –  Luke Belbina May 18 '11 at 4:09
    
I don't know. But again, try it and see what sort of performance you get. It would be simple to set up a simple console application that implements a typical string match using regex and also the String methods and see which one is faster. –  Andrew Cooper May 18 '11 at 4:11

From the code you show not clear why you need an abstract class and inheriting.
Using virtual members is slower. Moreover, your child classes aren't sealed.

Why don't you do something like this:

public class Parser
{
    private Regex regex;

    public Parser(string someRegex)
    {
        regex = new Regex(someRegex, RegexOptions.Compiled);
    }

    public string ParseSomethingCool(string text)
    {
        return regex.Match(text).Value;
    }
}

or like this

public static class Parser
{
    public static string ParseSomethingCool(string text, string someRegex)
    {
        return Regex.Match(text, someRegex).Value;
    }
}

However, I think the greatest gain in performance you would achieve if you use multi-threading. Probably you already do. If you don't take a look at Task Parallel Library

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Hey, yeah I do use parallel foreach. I am just optimizing each of the calls. The reason I use the abstract class is I have over 30 different parsers all parsing the exact same information but using different regex's. –  Luke Belbina May 18 '11 at 7:29
    
@nextgenneo - from what you describe you don't need abstract classes. If only regex is different you can supply it to the constructor of one class. –  Alex Aza May 18 '11 at 15:17
    
Yes but providing hundreds of Regex's is cumbersome. Also, some of the parsers might need to override a particular parsing action. This is because occasionaly the data might not actually be parsable through a regex but parsable by figuring out some context from the document. This would require overriding the corresponding parsing method. –  Luke Belbina May 19 '11 at 23:28

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