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#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
typedef  unsigned long long int ULL;
ULL gcd(ULL a, ULL b)
{
   for(; b >0 ;)
   {
       ULL rem = a % b;
       a = b;
       b = rem;
   }
   return a;
}
void pollard_rho(ULL n)
{
   ULL i = 0,y,k,d;
   ULL *x = new ULL[2*n];
   x[0] = rand() % n;
   y = x[0];
   k = 2;
   while(1){
       i = i+1;
       std::cout << x[i-1];
       x[i] = (x[i-1]*x[i-1]-1)%n;
       d = gcd(abs(y - x[i]),n);
       if(d!= 1 && d!=n)
          std::cout <<d<<std::endl;
       if(i+1==k){
         y = x[i];
         k = 2*k;
       }
   }
}

int main()
{
   srand(time(NULL));
   pollard_rho(10);

}

This implementation is derived from CLRS 2nd edition (Page number 894). while(1) looks suspicious to me. What should be the termination condition for the while loop?

I tried k<=n but that doesn't seem to work. I get segmentation fault. What is the flaw in the code and how to correct it?

share|improve this question
    
You are right about the while loop; there is no termination so i becomes large and indexes into x with an illegal value which causes the segmentation fault. –  Richard Schneider May 18 '11 at 5:57
    
So what should be the terminating condition? Please check out Pollard Rho's algorithm in CLRS. –  Pointer May 18 '11 at 5:59
    
Is this a trick question? How should we know what's wrong with it? –  Gabe May 18 '11 at 5:59
    
No its not a trick question. I want to know how to correct the code. –  Pointer May 18 '11 at 6:01

3 Answers 3

Why store all those intermediary values? You really don't need to put x and y in a array. Just use 2 variables which you keep reusing, x and y.

Also, replace while(1) with while(d == 1) and cut the loop before

 if(d!= 1 && d!=n)
      std::cout <<d<<std::endl;
   if(i+1==k){
     y = x[i];
     k = 2*k;

So your loop should become

while(d == 1)
{
    x = (x*x - 1) % n;
    y = (y*y - 1) % n;
    y = (y*y - 1) % n;
    d = abs(gcd(y-x,n))%n;
}
if(d!=n)
  std::cout <<d<<std::endl;
else
  std::cout<<"Can't find result with this function \n";

Extra points if you pass the function used inside the loop as a parameter to pollard, so that if it can't find the result with one function, it tries another.

share|improve this answer
1  
Hm. The while terminates when d != 1, so isn't the d != 1 in the if statement redundant? –  estan Oct 10 '13 at 17:16
    
@estan good find, will modify :) –  Cronco Oct 10 '13 at 18:08

I only have a 1st edition of CLRS, but assuming it's not too different from the 2nd ed., the answer to the termination condition is on the next page:

This procedure for finding a factor may seem somewhat mysterious at first. Note, however, that POLLARD-RHO never prints an incorrect answer; any number it prints is a nontrivial divisor of n. POLLARD-RHO may not print anything at all, though; there is no guarantee that it will produce any results. We shall see, however, that there is good reason to expect POLLARD-RHO to print a factor of p of n after approximately sqrt(p) iterations of the while loop. Thus, if n is composite, we can expect this procedure to discover enough divisors to factor n completely after approximately n1/4 update, since every prime factor p of n except possibly the largest one is less than sqrt(n).

So, technically speaking, the presentation in CLRS doesn't have a termination condition (that's probably why they call it a "heuristic" and "procedure" rather than an "algorithm") and there are no guarantees that it will ever actually produce anything useful. In practice, you'd likely want to put some iteration bound based on the expected n1/4 updates.

share|improve this answer

Try replacing while(1) { i = i + 1; with this:

for (i = 1; i < 2*n; ++i) {
share|improve this answer
    
doesn't seem to work. –  Pointer May 18 '11 at 6:08

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