Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to present a user with a form if he has not filled it out previously on login but redirect him to the homepage if he has filled in information previously. How do i accomplish this?

Here's my view:

def makinginfo(request):
    form = SongForm(request.POST or None)
    songprofile =  SongProfile.objects.get().filter(user=request.user)
    if songprofile = null: IS THIS RIGHT?     
        if form.is_valid():
            form.save()
            sp = SongProfile
            sp.song = form.pk
            sp.save()
            if 'next' in request.POST:
               next = request.POST['next']
            else:
               next = reverse('index_show')
               return HttpResponseRedirect(next)
        return render_to_response(
        'song/create.html',
           {'form':form},

             context_instance = RequestContext(request)
               )

     else:
        return render_to_response(
        'song/show.html',
         context_instance = RequestContext(request)
               )

Am i on the right track here?

Thanks,

ADDITIONAL INFO:

SongProfile and Song are two different models. SongProfile model is as follows: class SongProfile(models.Model): song = models.OneToOneField(Song) so when im trying to save both in song and songprofile where songprofile.song saves the latest id/pk of the record created in song. is this wrong?

share|improve this question
2  
1) You don't need the .get(). Make it just SongProfile.objects.filter(user=request.user) 2) null does not exist in Python. The equivalent is None, but all you have to do is check if songprofile: 3) Generally speaking, One-to-one relationships are only worthwhile if you need to add info to a model you don't control. If you control both, the fields on SongProfile should just go on Song. 4) You're missing the data dictionary parameter on the last render_to_response, pass an empty dict ({}) if you don't need anything. –  Chris Pratt May 18 '11 at 15:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I'm assuming there is only one SongProfile object per user.

 try:
    songprofile = SongProfile.objects.get(user=request.user)
    # Render song/show.html
 except SongProfile.DoesNotExist:
   if form.is_valid():
      # Process post

   # Render song/create.html

To create a new SongProfile object with the Song created by the form:

 song = form.save()
 songprofile = SongProfile(user=request.user)
 songprofile.song = song
 songprofile.save()

EDIT AGAIN:

Fixed backwards stuff and added Song object.

share|improve this answer
    
It is if songprofile is None: –  Natim May 18 '11 at 7:36
    
@Natim That is the syntactically correct version of songprofile = null, yes, but when using get(), a nonexistent result raises an exception--not returns null. –  Tim Yates May 18 '11 at 7:40
    
Yes I know your answer it the good one :) I just told him since he asked if it was correct. –  Natim May 18 '11 at 9:19
    
SongProfile and Song are two different models. SongProfile model is as follows: class SongProfile(models.Model): song = models.OneToOneField(Song) so when im trying to save both in song and songprofile where songprofile.song saves the latest id/pk of the record created in song. is this wrong? –  Eva611 May 18 '11 at 13:43
    
also shouldn't they be the other way round... songprofile.doesnotexist should render the form and process the post? –  Eva611 May 18 '11 at 14:06

You can, indeed, do a try/catch as Tim demonstrated and that will work. If you find that you are, in some cases, beginning to filter more fields or that you want a sensible default, you can do as the docs suggest and use the get_or_create() method, like so:

sp, created = SongProfile.objects.get_or_create(user=request.user)

From the docs:

Any keyword arguments passed to get_or_create() -- except an optional one called defaults -- will be used in a get() call. If an object is found, get_or_create() returns a tuple of that object and False. If an object is not found, get_or_create() will instantiate and save a new object, returning a tuple of the new object and True.

So the Boolean value indicates if the object needed to be created or not and you can use it to guide method logic.

This syntax, too, is a little briefer and cleaner.

As far as trying to save both Song and SongProfile, no, you're not wrong. As Tim demonstrated, form.save() creates the new song and songprofile.song = song, followed by the songprofile.save(), saves the songprofile's song reference.

There are a couple of small errors in the code example. One error is,

if songprofile = null:
    ...

which, were you to use it, as @Natim noted, should be,

if songprofile is None:
    ...

Another problem is in the line,

sp = SongProfile

which Python will, indeed, compile, but which assigns the SongProfile class object reference to the variable and not an instance of the class itself. What you want to do normally would be,

sp2 = SongProfile()

and that will create the object instance. If you do a dir(sp) and dir(sp2), you'll see the difference.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.