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Please tell me if there is a way to manually implement the Microsoft specific __super macro...

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5  
Please let us know what the __super macro does. –  nbt May 18 '11 at 7:12
2  
Actually __super is not a macro, but a keyword - msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/94dw1w7x(v=vs.80).aspx –  sharptooth May 18 '11 at 7:12
    
@Neil: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/94dw1w7x.aspx –  Xeo May 18 '11 at 7:12
    
do you have an specific use case that you want to solve? In general, the complexity of providing a full blown __super implementation with user code will be too much, but if you are concerned on a particular use case, it might not be that complex. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 18 '11 at 7:39
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3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted
class Base{
public:
  void func(){
    // something
  }
};

class Derived : public Base{
public:
  void func(){
    Base::func(); // just use the base class name
  }
};

Though I assume that's not what you want and you want a generic access for every class? I don't know of a direct solution, but you can always typedef your immediate base class:

class Derived : public Base{
  typedef Base super; // typedef accordingly in every class
public:
  void func(){
    super::func();
  }
};

Or even have an intermediate class just for the typedef if you really want..

template<class Base>
struct AddSuper : public Base {
protected:
  typedef Base super;
};

class Derived : public AddSuper<Base> {
public:
  void func(){
    super::func();
  }
};

Note that you should not forget to retypedef in every derived class, else you'll get holes in your call-chain.

One drawback: The whole construct blows up with multiple base classes. :/

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Thank you, Xeo! –  Ryan May 18 '11 at 7:30
    
@Ryan: A nice sideeffect from the typedef is, that you can use it in the initializer list instead of the (possibly long) base class name. :) –  Xeo May 18 '11 at 7:32
    
I've used the typedef trick (without the additional intermediate) a few times when inheriting from classes with template arguments. DRY at work... (or almost, since you need to repeat yourself once). –  Matthieu M. May 18 '11 at 7:34
    
@Matthieu: I generally do this for the current class with this_type or self_type or like MSVC MyType, especially if it's templated. It also brings a nice uniformity to all my operators. :) Also, I consider templated classes usually unusable without such a typedef. –  Xeo May 18 '11 at 7:36
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Avoid it, it makes your code unportable. If you want to have a short name for your base class then use a typedef:

class Derived: public BaseWithALongName
{
   typedef BaseWithALongName super;
};
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A keyword super was actually proposed a long while back in the C++ standardisation process,but it was rejected as unnecessary, as it could be implemented using the method described by Xeo in his answer - this is covered in Stroustrup's D&E book. I guess Microsoft decided it really is necessary, but be warned if you use it your code will not be portable.

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One good thing from the __super keyword that you can't emulate is that it considers all base classes. –  Xeo May 18 '11 at 7:21
    
@Xeo: it is a matter of making the code a little more cumbersome... you can write an adapter template that will inherit from all of the base classes and adds a using X::func; for each base class X. Then the most derived class need only inherit from that adapter. If you call it super then the syntax: super::func will dispatch to the immediate parent, that will have the using declarations and will consider all base classes. Still too much complexity for little to no gain. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 18 '11 at 7:38
    
@David: That's an interesting idea though, thanks for that. But you're right. You can't have such an adaptor as a simple mixin, it needs to be hand-coded for every hierarchy. :/ –  Xeo May 18 '11 at 7:39
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