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I need a really, really fast method of checking if a string is JSON or not. I feel like this is not the best way:

function isJson($string) {
    return ((is_string($string) &&
            (is_object(json_decode($string)) ||
            is_array(json_decode($string))))) ? true : false;
}

Any performance enthusiasts out there want to improve this method?

share|improve this question
2  
Consider only using json_decode once... also, check the input and return values of json_decode. –  user166390 May 18 '11 at 8:20
2  
So, which one is the answer? –  faridv Dec 6 '12 at 19:11
1  
The ternary switch here is redundant. Your statement already evaluates as a boolean. –  Adelphia Apr 9 at 17:46

14 Answers 14

function isJson($string) {
 json_decode($string);
 return (json_last_error() == JSON_ERROR_NONE);
}
share|improve this answer
5  
Looks like everyone is loving this answer. Any explanation why? –  Kirk May 18 '11 at 17:39
7  
I believe PHP 5.3 > is needed to use the json_last_error function –  Chris Harrison Sep 9 '11 at 2:55
34  
Checking first character of string for {, [ or first symbol of any other literal can potentially greatly speed this one up when many of incoming strings are expected to be non-JSON. –  Oleg V. Volkov Sep 25 '12 at 17:03
9  
$phone = '021234567'; var_dump(isJson($phone)); return true no! it should return false. –  vee Jan 2 '14 at 17:12
3  
Beware, this function will return true for any number also, whether you specify it as a string or a true number. 6.5 = true, '300' = true, 9 = true etc. So this might be a valid JSON value but the function might not behave as you expect, if you want to check only for valid JSON strings with {} or []; –  BadHorsie Feb 25 '14 at 16:57

Using json_decode to "probe" it might not actually be the fastest way. If it's a deeply nested structure, then instantiating a lot of objects of arrays to just throw them away is a waste of memory and time.

So it might be faster to use preg_match and the RFC4627 regex to also ensure validity:

  // in JS:
  var my_JSON_object = !(/[^,:{}\[\]0-9.\-+Eaeflnr-u \n\r\t]/.test(
         text.replace(/"(\\.|[^"\\])*"/g, '')));

The same in PHP:

  return !preg_match('/[^,:{}\\[\\]0-9.\\-+Eaeflnr-u \\n\\r\\t]/',
       preg_replace('/"(\\.|[^"\\\\])*"/', '', $json_string));

Not enough of a performance enthusiast to bother with benchmarks here however.

share|improve this answer
6  
Complete recursive regex to verify JSON here: stackoverflow.com/questions/2583472/regex-to-validate-json/… - But it turns out PHPs json_decode is always faster than a PCRE regex. (Though it's not very optimized, no synthetic tests found, and might behave differently in Perl..) –  mario May 31 '11 at 22:44
4  
error Unknown modifier 'g' –  vee Jan 2 '14 at 17:14
3  
@vee Yes, thanks for the note. But let's keep it here [incorrectly], so nobody actually uses that in production. –  mario Jan 2 '14 at 21:12
1  
@cartbeforehorse Okay, thanks. I fixed the escaping wholesome for PHPs double quoted string context then. –  mario Jul 9 '14 at 0:30
2  
@mario Okay, I see. So basically, the PHP escapes the backslashes before the reg-exp engine gets to see it. As far as the reg-exp engine is concerned, there are half the number of backslashes in the string as what we humans see. "Like reg-exp wasn't complicated enough already" –  cartbeforehorse Jul 9 '14 at 8:26

All you really need to do is this...

if (is_object(json_decode($MyJSONArray))) 
    { 
        ... do something ...
    }

This request does not require a separate function even. Just wrap is_object around json_decode and move on. Seams this solution has people putting way too much thought into it.

share|improve this answer
1  
You should also check for is_array(). –  ggutenberg Jul 30 '13 at 4:56
4  
@ggutenberg is_array() is for json_decode($json, true); –  Roman M. Kos Oct 24 '13 at 16:32
    
@RomanM.Kos Just to be clear, if the array is a simple array, then you need to use is_array in addition to is_object, else is_object will return false for simple arrays encoded as JSON. So @ggutenberg is right in this case. Passing the true argument to json_decode forces an object to be returned as an array. You could in theory always force the decode to an array and just check of is_array, that should work. –  userabuser Feb 14 '14 at 10:24
    
@userabuser If i json_encode($array) for simple PHP array, and then do json_decode($str) i will receive object, but not array. json_decode($str, true) forces to convert into array. Why do complicated string in your code? Check for is_array(json_decode($str, true)) and some time later when you read it you will understand that decoded must be only an array. Much harder to guess is_object(json_decode($MyJSONArray)) "Oh, here i am checking for decoded is an array or not?" –  Roman M. Kos Feb 14 '14 at 22:35
    
@RomanM.Kos No, that's not correct, codepad.viper-7.com/OFrtsq - as I said, you can always force json_decode to return an array to save you checking for object and array, but if you don't AND you json_decode what was a simple array to begin with, you will receive an array in return on decode, not an object. You must use JSON_FORCE_OBJECT if you want to always force an object on encode IF passing a simple array. –  userabuser Feb 15 '14 at 5:07

Answer to the Question

The function json_last_error returns the last error occurred during the JSON encoding and decoding. So the fastest way to check the valid JSON is

// decode the JSON data
// set second parameter boolean TRUE for associative array output.
$result = json_decode($json);

if (json_last_error() === JSON_ERROR_NONE) {
    // JSON is valid
}

// OR this is equivalent

if (json_last_error() === 0) {
    // JSON is valid
}

Note that json_last_error is supported in PHP >= 5.3.0 only.

Full program to check the exact ERROR

It is always good to know the exact error during the development time. Here is full program to check the exact error based on PHP docs.

function json_validate($string)
{
    // decode the JSON data
    $result = json_decode($string);

    // switch and check possible JSON errors
    switch (json_last_error()) {
        case JSON_ERROR_NONE:
            $error = ''; // JSON is valid // No error has occurred
            break;
        case JSON_ERROR_DEPTH:
            $error = 'The maximum stack depth has been exceeded.';
            break;
        case JSON_ERROR_STATE_MISMATCH:
            $error = 'Invalid or malformed JSON.';
            break;
        case JSON_ERROR_CTRL_CHAR:
            $error = 'Control character error, possibly incorrectly encoded.';
            break;
        case JSON_ERROR_SYNTAX:
            $error = 'Syntax error, malformed JSON.';
            break;
        // PHP >= 5.3.3
        case JSON_ERROR_UTF8:
            $error = 'Malformed UTF-8 characters, possibly incorrectly encoded.';
            break;
        // PHP >= 5.5.0
        case JSON_ERROR_RECURSION:
            $error = 'One or more recursive references in the value to be encoded.';
            break;
        // PHP >= 5.5.0
        case JSON_ERROR_INF_OR_NAN:
            $error = 'One or more NAN or INF values in the value to be encoded.';
            break;
        case JSON_ERROR_UNSUPPORTED_TYPE:
            $error = 'A value of a type that cannot be encoded was given.';
            break;
        default:
            $error = 'Unknown JSON error occured.';
            break;
    }

    if ($error !== '') {
        // throw the Exception or exit // or whatever :)
        exit($error);
    }

    // everything is OK
    return $result;
}

Testing with Valid JSON INPUT

$json = '[{"user_id":13,"username":"stack"},{"user_id":14,"username":"over"}]';
$output = json_validate($json);
print_r($output);

Valid OUTPUT

Array
(
    [0] => stdClass Object
        (
            [user_id] => 13
            [username] => stack
        )

    [1] => stdClass Object
        (
            [user_id] => 14
            [username] => over
        )
)

Testing with invalid JSON

$json = '{background-color:yellow;color:#000;padding:10px;width:650px;}';
$output = json_validate($json);
print_r($output);

Invalid OUTPUT

Syntax error, malformed JSON.

Extra note for (PHP >= 5.2 && PHP < 5.3.0)

Since json_last_error is not supported in PHP 5.2, you can check if the encoding or decoding returns boolean FALSE. Here is an example

// decode the JSON data
$result = json_decode($json);
if ($result === FALSE) {
    // JSON is invalid
}

Hope this is helpful. Happy Coding!

share|improve this answer
    
Superb validator @Madan. Thanks a lot for your contribution. –  Inuka Apr 11 '14 at 4:39
function is_json($str){ 
    return json_decode($str) != null;
}

http://tr.php.net/manual/en/function.json-decode.php return value is null when invalid encoding detected.

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2  
It will also improperly return null for "null" (which isn't valid JSON, but may be entirely "valid" to json_decode otherwise). Go figure. –  user166390 May 18 '11 at 8:22
    
I think this sould be: json_decode($str)!=null; or otherwise the function should be called is_not_json. –  Yoshi May 18 '11 at 8:23
    
That function would be better renamed "is something other than JSON"! –  lonesomeday May 18 '11 at 8:23
    
Right. Sorry for my mistake. –  ahmet alp balkan May 18 '11 at 9:31
    
@user166390, json_decode('null') is valid JSON according to the spec‌​, and should return the value of null. –  zzzzBov May 8 at 1:23

Another simple way

function is_json($str)
{
    return is_array(json_decode($str,true));
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This isn't correct. Any PHP type can be encoded into JSON such as objects, strings, etc and the json_decode function is expected to return them. This is only true if you are always decoding arrays and no other variable types. –  Chaoix Aug 15 '14 at 19:38
    
@Chaoix using json_decode($str,true) makes it convert objects to arrays so it will pass the is_array check. You correct about strings, integers, etc. though. –  Paul Phillips Mar 18 at 10:05
    
I see the what you mean about the second parameter on json_encode. I still think @Ahad Ali's solution is a much better one in terms of typing and only doing a json_decode once in your algorithms. –  Chaoix Mar 26 at 17:08

You must validate your input to make sure the string you pass is not empty and is, in fact, a string. An empty string is not valid JSON.

function is_json($string) {
  return !empty($string) && is_string($string) && is_array(json_decode($string, true)) && json_last_error() == 0;
}

I think in PHP it's more important to determine if the JSON object even has data, because to use the data you will need to call json_encode() or json_decode(). I suggest denying empty JSON objects so you aren't unnecessarily running encodes and decodes on empty data.

function has_json_data($string) {
  $array = json_decode($string, true);
  return !empty($string) && is_string($string) && is_array($array) && !empty($array) && json_last_error() == 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for actually thinking about the problem in a real-world context. –  cartbeforehorse Jul 9 '14 at 8:33
    
Just be wary that '0' (the string of zero)is empty by php logic... –  Kzqai Nov 24 '14 at 20:06
    
But '0' is not valid json... why would I be wary? @Kzqai –  upful Dec 5 '14 at 20:05

Earlier i was just checking for a null value, which was wrong actually.

    $data = "ahad";
    $r_data = json_decode($data);
    if($r_data){//json_decode will return null, which is the behavior we expect
        //success
    }

The above piece of code works fine with strings. However as soon as i provide number, it breaks up.for example.

    $data = "1213145";
    $r_data = json_decode($data);

    if($r_data){//json_decode will return 1213145, which is the behavior we don't expect
        //success
    }

To fix it what i did was very simple.

    $data = "ahad";
    $r_data = json_decode($data);

    if(($r_data != $data) && $r_data)
        print "Json success";
    else
        print "Json error";
share|improve this answer
    
Nice solution. Handles the typing issue very well! –  Chaoix Aug 15 '14 at 19:40

The most simplest and fastest way that I use is following;

$json_array = json_decode( $raw_json , true );


if( $json_array == NULL )   //check if it was invalid json string

die ('Invalid');  // json error


 // you can enter some else condition to display success message over here

It is because json_decode() returns NULL if the entered string is not json or invalid json.

share|improve this answer
1  
json_decode('null') == NULL and null is a valid JSON value. –  zzzzBov May 8 at 1:34
    
I have tested if 'null' is valid json at json.parser.online but it seems that its not valid json. And json_decode() is php core function to validate json so I doubt to get some false result in our output. –  Mohammad Mursaleen May 24 at 2:01
    
Rather than trust some unverified website, consider consulting the spec, which disagrees (pg 2). Alternatively, try JSON.parse('null') in your dev console. –  zzzzBov May 24 at 2:16

I don't know about performance or elegance of my solution, but it's what I'm using:

if (preg_match('/^[\[\{]\"/', $string)) {
    $aJson = json_decode($string, true);
    if (!is_null($aJson)) {
       ... do stuff here ...
    }
}

Since all my JSON encoded strings start with {" it suffices to test for this with a RegEx. I'm not at all fluent with RegEx, so there might be a better way to do this. Also: strpos() might be quicker.

Just trying to give in my tuppence worth.

P.S. Just updated the RegEx string to /^[\[\{]\"/ to also find JSON array strings. So it now looks for either [" or {" at the beginning of the string.

share|improve this answer

The custom function

function custom_json_decode(&$contents=NULL, $normalize_contents=true, $force_array=true){

    //---------------decode contents---------------------

    $decoded_contents=NULL;

    if(is_string($contents)){

        $decoded_contents=json_decode($contents,$force_array);

    }

    //---------------normalize contents---------------------

    if($normalize_contents===true){

        if(is_string($decoded_contents)){

            if($decoded_contents==='NULL'||$decoded_contents==='null'){

                $contents=NULL;
            }
            elseif($decoded_contents==='FALSE'||$decoded_contents==='false'){

                $contents=false;
            }
        }
        elseif(!is_null($decoded_contents)){

            $contents=$decoded_contents;
        }
    }
    else{

        //---------------validation contents---------------------

        $contents=$decoded_contents;
    }

    return $contents;
}

Cases

$none_json_str='hello';

//------------decoding a none json str---------------

$contents=custom_json_decode($none_json_str); // returns 'hello'

//------------checking a none json str---------------

custom_json_decode($none_json_str,false);

$valid_json=false;

if(!is_null($none_json_str)){

    $valid_json=true;

}

Resources

https://gist.github.com/rafasashi/93d06bae83cc1a1f440b

share|improve this answer

Freshly-made function for PHP 5.2 compatibility, if you need the decoded data on success:

function try_json_decode( $json, & $success = null ){
  // non-strings may cause warnings
  if( !is_string( $json )){
    $success = false;
    return $json;
  }

  $data = json_decode( $json );

  // output arg
  $success =

    // non-null data: success!
    $data !==  null  ||

    // null data from 'null' json: success!
    $json === 'null' ||

    // null data from '  null  ' json padded with whitespaces: success!
    preg_match('/^\s*null\s*$/', $json );

  // return decoded or original data
  return $success ? $data : $json;
}

Usage:

$json_or_not = ...;

$data = try_json_decode( $json_or_not, $success );

if( $success )
     process_data( $data );
else what_the_hell_is_it( $data );

Some tests:

var_dump( try_json_decode( array(), $success ), $success );
// ret = array(0){}, $success == bool(false)

var_dump( try_json_decode( 123, $success ), $success );
// ret = int(123), $success == bool(false)

var_dump( try_json_decode('      ', $success ), $success );
// ret = string(6) "      ", $success == bool(false)

var_dump( try_json_decode( null, $success ), $success );
// ret = NULL, $success == bool(false)

var_dump( try_json_decode('null', $success ), $success );
// ret = NULL, $success == bool(true)

var_dump( try_json_decode('  null  ', $success ), $success );
// ret = NULL, $success == bool(true)

var_dump( try_json_decode('  true  ', $success ), $success );
// ret = bool(true), $success == bool(true)

var_dump( try_json_decode('  "hello"  ', $success ), $success );
// ret = string(5) "hello", $success == bool(true)

var_dump( try_json_decode('  {"a":123}  ', $success ), $success );
// ret = object(stdClass)#2 (1) { ["a"]=> int(123) }, $success == bool(true)
share|improve this answer

Expanding on this answer How about the following:

<?php

    $json = '[{"user_id":13,"username":"stack"},{"user_id":14,"username":"over"}]';
    //$json = '12';

    function isJson($string) {
        json_decode($string);
        if(json_last_error() == JSON_ERROR_NONE) {
            if(substr($string,0,1) == '[' && substr($string,-1) == ']') { return TRUE; }
            else if(substr($string,0,1) == '{' && substr($string,-1) == '}') { return TRUE; }
            else { return FALSE; }
        }
    }

    echo isJson($json);
?>
share|improve this answer
if(!empty(json_decode($data)))
{
echo "real json";
}
share|improve this answer
    
json_decode() doesn't work with empty in that way. You need to fill a variable $data = json_decode($data) and only then evaluate with empty() –  Alwin Kesler Aug 20 '13 at 3:38
1  
From PHP 5.5.x empty() will work as described by @EvilThinker . See php.net/ChangeLog-5.php#5.5.0 –  Wandering Zombie Feb 22 '14 at 20:28
2  
@Alwin from 5.5. up it works! –  EvilThinker Feb 23 '14 at 11:48
    
Okey...you can do the same in two steps...I think php version is not a real problem. –  Polak Mar 17 at 14:48
    
json_decode('false') will fail, along with string values of null, 0, and "". –  zzzzBov May 8 at 1:36

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