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I have a RootElement declared and set up how I want on a DialogViewController, using the element-based API rather than the reflection API. Looks great.

However I'm struggling to work out how I can get the values out. Using the reflection-based API this is easy, but I don't see how I can use BindingContext.Fetch() with an explicitly declared RootElement.

I can't find an example in the samples, nor can I work out how to do this myself.

var root = new RootElement(null){
    new Section(){
        new StringElement("Title here"),
        new FloatElement(null, null, 5f)
    }
};

var dv = new DialogViewController(root, true);

dv.ViewDisappearing += delegate {
    // what goes here to get at the value of the FloatElement?
};

NavigationController.PushViewController(dv, true);

Any help appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
Wouldn't you just traverse your root to find the element you want, then use it's Value property to get the value? –  Jason May 18 '11 at 19:00
    
That's what I thought. But there is no way to uniquely identify one FloatElement from another. So I solved this by adding a Key property to Element - allowing the traversal code to identify a specific element uniquely. –  tomfanning May 19 '11 at 14:09

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can store it in a variable, that is scoped where your anonymous method can access it.

Like this:

var floatElement = new FloatElement(null, null, 5f);
var root = new RootElement(null){
    new Section(){
        new StringElement("Title here"),
        floatElement,
    }
};

var dv = new DialogViewController(root, true);

dv.ViewDisappearing += delegate {
    //You can access floatElement here
    Console.WriteLine(floatElement.Value);
};

NavigationController.PushViewController(dv, true);
share|improve this answer
    
Good way of dealing with it, although you partially lose the nice C# 3.0 initialiser style. Marked as the answer because it works, even though it's not what I ended up doing. (See my comment on the other answer) –  tomfanning May 19 '11 at 14:10
    
Imo the best solution. Alternatively, keep all the elements in a list, and keep track of the indexes? Just a suggestion, if you have many elements to handle. –  Bjarke Søgaard Feb 5 at 9:23

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