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I have a class and want to work with it as Lists: e.g. List<int>, List<string>, ... , List<T> I have a class Randomizor which will take the collection data type that will be shuffled. How can I do so?

class Randomizor<T>
{
    public Randomizor()
    {

    }

    public Array Shuffle(Array toShuffle)
    {

    }
}
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1  
As a side-note; The correct spelling is "Randomiser", or "Randomizer" ( in American English ) –  Uw Concept May 18 '11 at 11:24
    
Don't you actually want an extender of IEnumerable<T>, called Shuffle, that will return a randomly reordered IEnumerable<T>? If not, what will the rest of the class do? –  Jodrell May 18 '11 at 11:27
6  
@Uw Concept, so the correct spelling is Randomiser :-) –  Jodrell May 18 '11 at 11:28
    
Hahahahaha! Fabulous comment @Jodrell –  Uw Concept May 18 '11 at 11:32
    
@Jodrell : I want to add this extention –  Desolator May 18 '11 at 11:33
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6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

EDIT: I found two superior impementations after a little digging so I would suggest those in preference.

An extension method for this purpose and already been suggested previously here I include the code paraphrased to Shuffle below.

public static IEnumerable<T> Shuffle<T> (this IEnumerable<T> source)
{     
    Random random = new Random ();     
    T [] copy = source.ToArray ();      
    for (int i = copy.Length - 1; i >= 0; i--) 
    {         
        int index = random.Next (i + 1);
        yield return copy [index];
        copy [index] = copy [i];
    }
}

And an interesting solution adapted from this linq approach

public static IEnumerable<T> Shuffle<T> (this IEnumerable<T> source)
{     
    Random random = new Random ();     
    return source.OrderBy(i => Random.Next()).AsEnumerable();
}

The orignal answer but slower than the edits

public static IEnumerable<T> Shuffle<T>(this IEnumerable<T> sequence) 
{     
    Random random = new Random();
    List<T> copy = sequence.ToList();
    while (copy.Count > 0)
    {
        int index = random.Next(copy.Count);
        yield return copy[index];
        copy.RemoveAt(index);
    }
} 

If you like one of these you should up vote the linked answer.

If you are very concerned about randomness, you could upgrade to one of the RNG algorithms from the Crypto API and seed it with some non deterministic value, like somthing generated from recent mouse activity. I suspect that would be overkill and it would degrade performance.

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As noted in the comments of the original answer this algorithm has higher complexity than needed because of the use of RemoveAt for a list. –  Stilgar May 18 '11 at 12:09
    
@ Stilgar, Agreed, I've updated to reflect this. –  Jodrell May 18 '11 at 12:22
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Create a generic class like so:

class Randomizer<TList, TType> where TList : IList<TType>
{
    public TList Randomize(TList list)
    {
        // ...
    }
}

Or like so:

class Randomizer<T>
{
    public IList<T> Randomize(IList<T> list)
    {
        // ...
    }
}
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Where's the implementation? –  Jodrell May 18 '11 at 12:22
    
Left to the OP. I think his question was about how to use generics in that case, not how to really implement the randomizing... –  Daniel Hilgarth May 18 '11 at 13:35
    
Your right, the question is not clear. –  Jodrell May 18 '11 at 13:43
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Not very clear question... do you mean something like this?

public static class Randomizer<T>
{
   public static T GetRandom(List<T> list)
   {
      T value = default(T);
      // Perform some random logic.

      return value;
   }
}
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Approximately. But will T return a collection ? –  Desolator May 18 '11 at 11:24
add comment
class Randomizor<T>
{
    public Randomizor()
    {

    }

    public List<T> Shuffle(List<T> toShuffle)
    {

    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment
class Randomizer<T>
{
    public Randomizer(ICollection<T> collection)
    {
        //Do something with collection using T as the type of the elements
    }            
}

However you may want to go for a generic extension method

static class Randomizer
{
    public static void Randomize<T>(this ICollection<T> collection)
    {
        //randomize the collection
    }
}

and the usage:

List<int> list = new List<int> { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 };
list.Randomize();
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Thank you. I have the following algorithm : have a list of int stores the available places. Put the content of a random index in the result collection. Delete the index from available places. How Can I return this result, please? –  Desolator May 18 '11 at 11:39
    
Well just make the method return a new collection instead of doing the shuffle in place (like my method signature suggests) –  Stilgar May 18 '11 at 12:06
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Maybe like this:

    public List<T> Shuffle<T>(List<T> toShuffle)
    {
        return toShuffle.OrderBy(x => Guid.NewGuid()).ToList();
    }

Or as an extension method

public static class Extensions
{
    public static List<T> Shuffle<T>(this List<T> toShuffle)
    {
        return toShuffle.OrderBy(x => Guid.NewGuid()).ToList();
    }
}
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Woah! down voted! Porque?! –  Dve May 18 '11 at 11:54
    
Probably because ordering by random does not yield even distribution? Let me downvote you too:) blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2011/01/31/… –  Stilgar May 18 '11 at 12:13
    
What part of the question even mentioned 'even distribution'? –  Dve May 18 '11 at 12:16
    
OK but lets agree that an exception or infinite loop is not desired effect for any question on stack overflow even if it does not explicitly state that, shall we? :) –  Stilgar May 18 '11 at 12:30
    
I have no problem if the code I provided is incorrect. But I can not see where it would cause an infinite loop –  Dve May 18 '11 at 12:40
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