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I have this propery in my entity class:

@Column(name="avatar",nullable=false,length=1000)
String getAvatarData() {
    return new JSONObject(avatar.export()).toString();
}
void setAvatarData(String data) {
    avatar = Avatar.restore(new JSONObject(data).toMap());
}

Hibernate doesn't handle it at all. At least, it's not included in the schema it generates.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
@Access(AccessType.PROPERTY)

on your entity. That's JPA 2.0. For 1.0, use org.hibernate.AccessType:

@AccessType("property")

By the way, I would rather have a simple field with getters and setters, and annotate the field instead. Then, if you want custom transformations, add other methods, like getFooAsJSON

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I added that annotation to getAvatarData, with no effect. It's also not mentioned in the documentation (which is rather vague about using propery access instead of field access). docs.jboss.org/hibernate/core/3.6/reference/en-US/html/… –  Bart van Heukelom May 18 '11 at 11:26
    
Oh, I see it needs to be on the class. Is that really necessary? I have many other columns in the class, for which field access is fine. –  Bart van Heukelom May 18 '11 at 11:27

To clarify Bozho's answer: in JPA 2.0 (Hibernate 3.5 and above) you declare a single field with property access as following:

@Access(AccessType.FIELD)
public class Foo {
    ...
    @Access(AccessType.PROPERTY)
    @Column(name="avatar",nullable=false,length=1000) 
    String getAvatarData() { ... }

    void setAvatarData(String data) { ... }
}

in previous versions of Hibernate - as following (note that annotations are still placed on the field):

@Access("field")
public class Foo {
    ...
    @Access("property")
    @Column(name="avatar",nullable=false,length=1000) 
    private Avatar avatarData;

    String getAvatarData() { ... }
    void setAvatarData(String data) { ... } 
    ...
}
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