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I have developed a C# application which makes heavy use of events. Now this application is occasionally doing funny things that I cannot understand or track down to a specific cause why they should occur. I reckon that the cause for these intermittent malfunctions is some sort of concurrency or race condition which I did not anticipate.

Thus my question: How exactly are events handled in C#? If an event is raised, will (a) the portion of code attached to that event be executed immediately? Or will the event (b) be put on a stack of events and be executed whenever .NET deems it suitable for execution while other code is executed in the meantime?

I hope my question was understandable and concise enough to get an authoritative answer.

Thanks, Geoff

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6 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

If an event is raised, will the portion of code attached to that event be executed immediately?

Well, yes and no. Events are multicast delegates, so there might be zero, one or many "portions of code" attached to an event. In the scenario where there are many, clearly one of them has to go first and one of them has to go second. The one that goes second isn't executed immediately upon the event being raised; it's executed immediately upon the first event handler completing normally.

will the event be put on a stack of events and be executed whenever .NET deems it suitable for execution while other code is executed in the meantime?

Suppose your application is badly written and hangs the UI. While the UI is hung, the user clicks on button 1 and button 2. Since the application is hung, nothing visible happens. The events for button 1 and button 2 being clicked do not fire. But Windows has created a message queue and enqueued on it the fact that button 1 and button 2 have pending clicks that need to be processed when the application unhangs itself. When the message loop is pumped then the button 1 click event fires. When it is done doing its thing, the message loop is pumped again and the button 2 click event fires.

So yes, in that sense events are queued up and executed later, but it is not "when .NET deems it suitable"; it's when the thread that is processing the message queue starts processing the message queue again. There's no mysterious Windows policy in here controlling your code.

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"When it is done doing its thing, the message loop is pumped again and the button 1 click event fires." Do you mean button 2 click event?" –  Brian May 18 '11 at 13:40
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It entirely depends on the event raising (and subscription) code.

If you're raising the event like this:

EventHandler handler = MyEvent;

if (handler != null)
{
    handler(this, EventArgs.Empty);
}

or something similar, then all the event handlers will be executed immediately. That's the typical implementation... you have to work a bit harder to put each event delegate into WinForms message queue or something like that.

If you could give us more information about what events you're talking about and how they're implemented, we may be able to help you more.

For more information on events and delegates (and the difference between them) you may wish to read my article on the topic.

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C# events, just like the rest of delegates, are executed immediately when triggered.

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Unless explicitly implemented otherwise, events are called synchronously.

Typically the code that triggers an event looks like that:

public event EventHandler MyEvent;

protected virtual void OnMyEvent()
{
    EventHandler handler = MyEvent; // keep a copy to avoid race conditions
    if (handler != null)
        handler(this, EventArgs.Empty);
}

As you can see from this code, event handlers are called immediately and synchronously from the OnMyEvent method.

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I believe your question has been answered here:

Are Event Handlers processed Asynchronously?

In short, it depends on your implementation, but the default event handling is processed synchronously. There are, however, ways to make it asynchronous.

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As stated in the previous awnser, it entirely depends on the code that is raising the event or handeling the event.

What above examples are missing is properly code on how to raise/handle events. I'm aware that they're just quick examples, but nonetheless, good practise is important.

If you want good examples/material on how events can be properly processed in C#, you could take a look at this article: http://www.codeproject.com/KB/cs/event_fundamentals.aspx

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