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I'm currently trying to communicate between java and flex by using sockets and AMF serialized objects.

On the java side I use Amf3Input and Amf3Output from BlazeDS (flex-messaging-common.jar and flex-messaging-core.jar).

The connection is correctly established, and if i try to send object from flex to java, i can easily read objects :

FLEX side :

protected function button2_clickHandler(event:MouseEvent):void
{
    var tmp:FlexAck = new FlexAck;
    tmp.id="123456789123456789123456789";
    tmp.name="A";
    tmp.source="Aaaaaa";
    tmp.ackGroup=false;
    s.writeObject(tmp);
    s.flush();
}

JAVA side :

ServerSocket servSoc = new ServerSocket(8888);
Socket s = servSoc.accept();
Amf3Output amf3Output = new Amf3Output(SerializationContext.getSerializationContext());
amf3Output.setOutputStream(s.getOutputStream());
Amf3Input amf3Input = new Amf3Input(SerializationContext.getSerializationContext());
amf3Input.setInputStream(s.getInputStream());
while(true)
{
    try
    {
      Object obj = amf3Input.readObject();
      if(obj!=null){
          if (obj instanceof AckOrder){
          System.out.println(((AckOrder)obj).getId());
      }
      }                 
}
catch (Exception e)
{
      e.printStackTrace();
  break;
}
  }
  amf3Output.close();
  amf3Input.close();
  servSoc.close();

In this way it works perfectly, but the problem is to read objects sent from the java side.

The code I use in java is :

for(int i=0;i<10;i++){
    ack = new AckOrder(i,"A","B", true);
    amf3Output.writeObject(ack);
    amf3Output.writeObjectEnd();
    amf3Output.flush();
}

I have an handler on ProgressEvent.SOCKET_DATA :

trace((s.readObject() as FlexAck).id);

But I have errors such as : Error #2030: End of File detected Error #2006: Index Out of bound

If i add manipulations on ByteArrays, i manage to read the first object, but not the following.

s.readBytes(tmp,tmp.length);
content = clone(tmp);
(content.readObject());
trace("########################## OK OBJECT RECEIVED");
var ack:FlexAck = (tmp.readObject() as FlexAck); 
trace("**********************> id = "+ack.id);

I've spent many our trying to find something in several forums etc, but nothing helped.

So if someone could help me it would be great.

Thanks

Sylvain

EDIT :

Here is an example that I thought should work, but doesn't I hope that it's better illustrate what I aim to do (permanent connection with socket and an exchange of messages).

Java class :

import java.net.ServerSocket;
import java.net.Socket;
import awl.oscare.protocol.AckOrder;
import flex.messaging.io.SerializationContext;
import flex.messaging.io.amf.Amf3Input;
import flex.messaging.io.amf.Amf3Output;


public class Main {
public static void main(String[] args) {
        while(true)
        {
        try {
        ServerSocket servSoc = new ServerSocket(8888);
        Socket s = servSoc.accept();
        System.out.println("connection accepted");
        Amf3Output amf3Output = new Amf3Output(SerializationContext.getSerializationContext());
        amf3Output.setOutputStream(s.getOutputStream());
        Amf3Input amf3Input = new Amf3Input(SerializationContext.getSerializationContext());
        amf3Input.setInputStream(s.getInputStream());
        while(true)
        {
            try
            {
                System.out.println("Reading object");
                Object obj = amf3Input.readObject();
                if(obj!=null)
                {
                    System.out.println(obj.getClass());
                    if (obj instanceof AckOrder)
                    {
                        AckOrder order = new AckOrder();
                          order.setId(((AckOrder)obj).getId());
order.setName(((AckOrder)obj).getName());
                          order.setSource(((AckOrder)obj).getSource());
                        order.setAckGroup(((AckOrder)obj).isAckGroup());
                          System.out.println(((AckOrder)obj).getId());
                        amf3Output.writeObject(order);
                        amf3Output.writeObjectEnd();
                        amf3Output.flush();
                    }
                }
            }
            catch (Exception e)
            {
                e.printStackTrace();
                break;
            }
        }
        amf3Output.close();
        amf3Input.close();
        servSoc.close();
    } catch (Exception e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
    }

}
}

Java Serializable object :

package protocol;

import java.io.Serializable;

public class AckOrder implements Serializable {
  private static final long serialVersionUID = 5106528318894546695L;
  private String id;
private String name;
private String source;
private boolean ackGroup = false;

public String getId() {
    return this.id;
}

public void setId(String id) {
    this.id = id;
}

public String getName() {
    return this.name;
}

public void setName(String name) {
    this.name = name;
}

public void setSource(String source) {
    this.source = source;
}

public String getSource() {
    return this.source;
}

public void setAckGroup(boolean ackGroup) {
    this.ackGroup = ackGroup;
}

public boolean isAckGroup() {
    return this.ackGroup;
}

public AckOrder()
{
    super();
}
}

Flex Side :

Main flex code :

<fx:Script>
    <![CDATA[
        import mx.collections.ArrayCollection;
        import mx.controls.Alert;
        import mx.events.FlexEvent;
        import mx.utils.object_proxy;


        private var _socket:Socket = new Socket();;

        private function onCreationComplete():void
        {
            this._socket.connect("localhost",8888);
            this._socket.addEventListener(ProgressEvent.SOCKET_DATA, onData);
        }

        private function onData(e:ProgressEvent):void
        {

            if(this._socket.bytesAvailable)
            {
                this._socket.endian = Endian.LITTLE_ENDIAN;
                var objects:Array = [];
                try{
                    while(this._socket.bytesAvailable > 0)
                    {
                        objects.push(this._socket.readObject());
                    }
                }catch(e:Error){trace(e.message);}
                    trace("|"+(objects)+"|");
            }

        }

        protected function sendButton_clickHandler(event:MouseEvent):void
        {
            var tmp:FlexAck = new FlexAck;
            tmp.id="1";
            tmp.name="A";
            tmp.source="B";
            tmp.ackGroup=false;
            this._socket.writeObject(tmp);
            this._socket.flush();
        }


    ]]>
</fx:Script>
<s:Button x="0" y="0" name="send" label="Send" click="sendButton_clickHandler(event)"/>

Flex serializable object :

package
{

[Bindable]
[RemoteClass(alias="protocol.AckOrder")] 
public class FlexAck
{
    public function FlexAck()
    {
    }

    public var id:String;
    public var name:String;
    public var source:String;
    public var ackGroup:Boolean;

}
}

Edit 25/05/2011 :

I've added those listeners in my flex code :

this._socket.addEventListener(Event.ACTIVATE,onActivate);
                this._socket.addEventListener(Event.CLOSE,onClose);
                this._socket.addEventListener(Event.CONNECT,onConnect);
                this._socket.addEventListener(Event.DEACTIVATE,onDeactivate);
                this._socket.addEventListener(IOErrorEvent.IO_ERROR,onIOerror);
            this._socket.addEventListener(SecurityErrorEvent.SECURITY_ERROR,onSecurityError);

But There's no errors and I still don't manage to receive objects correctly.

share|improve this question
    
Why would you read it twice if only one object is sent? –  J_A_X May 18 '11 at 14:12
    
In fact, The java code that sends the object is in a loop that tries to send 10 objects. –  Sylvain May 18 '11 at 15:01
    
Then that code is not being shown. What you showed was one object being created, end line added, and flushed. –  J_A_X May 18 '11 at 15:03
    
I've edited my code to add the loop for a better comprehension. –  Sylvain May 18 '11 at 15:13
    
Is there a reason for not using standard services-config.xml configuration? –  fglez Oct 15 '11 at 11:05
add comment

3 Answers

You have to send the AMF data as ByteArray on the server:

final ByteArrayOutputStream baos = new ByteArrayOutputStream();
amf3Output.setOutputStream(baos);
amf3Output.writeObject(order);
amf3Output.flush();
amf3Output.close();
s.getOutputStream().write(baos.toByteArray());

Then

this._socket.readObject()

works as expected !

share|improve this answer
add comment

Hi the problem is caused by the following:

  1. An AMF stream is stateful. When it serializes objects, it compresses them relative to objects that it have already been written.

  2. Compression is achieved by referencing previously sent class descriptions, string values and objects using indexes (so for example, if the first string you sent was "heloWorld", when you later send that string, the AMF stream will sent string index 0).

  3. Unfortunately, ByteArray and Socket do not maintain reference tables between readObject calls. Thus, even if you keep appending your newly read objects to the end of the same ByteArray object, each call to readObject instantiates new reference tables, discarding previously created ones (this means it should work for repeated references to the same string within an object tree)

  4. In your example, you are always writing the same string values to properties. Thus when you send the second object, its string properties are not serialized as strings, but as references to the strings in the previously written object.

The solution, is to create a new AMF stream for each object you send.

This is complete rubbish of course(!) It means we can't really utilize the compression in custom protocols. It would be much better if our protocols could decide when to reset the these reference tables, perhaps when they got too big.

For example, if you have an RPC protocol, it would be nice to have an AMF stream pass the remote method names as references rather than strings for speed...

I haven't checked but I think this sort of thing is done by RTMP. The reason it probably wouldn't have been made available in developer objects like ByteArray and Socket (sigh, I hope this isn't true) is because Adobe wants to push us towards LCDS...

Addendum/edit: just found this, which provides a solution http://code.google.com/p/cvlib/

share|improve this answer
add comment

After looking at the code, I think what you want to do on the Java end is this:

for(int i=0;i<10;i++){
    ack = new AckOrder(i,"A","B", true);
    amf3Output.writeObject(ack);
}
amf3Output.flush();

When you do 'flush', you're sending information over the socket so you only had one object being sent at a time. On the Flex end, you should always try to see what's the length of the object and make sure you're not going over it which would cause this error.

EDIT:

private var _socket:Socket = new Socket();

private function onCreationComplete():void
{
    // Add connection socket info here
    this._socket.addEventListener(ProgressEvent.SOCKET_DATA, onData);
}

// This gets called every time we get new info, as in after the server flushes
private function onData(e:ProgressEvent):void
{
    if(this._socket.bytesAvailable)
    {
        this._socket.endian = Endian.LITTLE_ENDIAN; // Might not be needed, but often is
        // Try to get objects
        var objects:Array = [];
        try{
            while(this._socket.bytesAvailable > 0)
            {
                objects.push(this._socket.readObject());
            }
        }catch(e:Error){}
        // Do something with objects array
    }
}

The onData function is called continually (every time the server sends info) since everything is asynchronous.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm sorry, I thought that my description was clear but I can see that it is not the case. In fact I would like to read one object at a time. I've created this loop to simulate a process that will communicate with my flex code by sending objects. So it could be one object sent and an other one several seconds later (with a persistent connection via sockets). I've tried to use the code that you posted, but I still have problems to read more than one object. –  Sylvain May 19 '11 at 12:20
    
If you just send one object, the Flex end will only get one object... I'm not sure what you don't understand about this concept... You're essentially trying to read an object that your client hasn't received yet. –  J_A_X May 19 '11 at 12:36
    
What I try is to open the socket => send 1 object => read the object, and keep the connection open, then, send a new object and read this new object. Everything is ok until I try to read the 2nd object. –  Sylvain May 19 '11 at 12:45
    
Okay, apparently you don't seem to get how sockets work, so I'm going to create some extra code for you. –  J_A_X May 19 '11 at 13:11
1  
There has to be something you're not doing right. I've seen this work time and time again. It makes no sense that it can send only one object ever. I would say to keep an eye on the stream transfer to see if bytes are actually being sent over. From my experience, these things are normally server issues. –  J_A_X May 23 '11 at 12:46
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