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I have a variable x that accepts a range of values from 0 - 500.

I want to represdnt this variable's value in a new variable xScaled that accepts a range of 0 - 1.

Example: Given x = 292 what is the relative value of xScaled and how can this be calculated?

Thanks

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3  
It is a real question, it's just offtopic. Regardless, it's trivial enough that it's easier to answer than to close. –  Blindy May 18 '11 at 14:13
2  
@Blindy Its a prefectly valid math question. Just because I havent decalred variables in programing terms doesnt make it "off topic" in my opinion. –  Sabobin May 18 '11 at 14:16
1  
Actually it does, there is a math stackoverflow site. But in case you haven't noticed, I'm defending your question :) –  Blindy May 18 '11 at 14:22

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Just divide by 500:

xScaled = 292/500;
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You seem to be asking for the formula:

xScaled = x / 500

For a more general solution, the following pseudo-code can map one range to another:

def mapRange (x, from_min, from_max, to_min, to_max):
    return (x - from_min) * (to_max - to_min) / (from_max - from_min) + to_min
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Divide by the maximum value: (0-500) becomes (0/500-500/500)=(0-1).

So for 292, scaled it becomes 292/500.

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No offence intended, but this is fairly simple arithmetics. Your programming skills will greatly improve if you spend just few minutes a day here: http://www.khanacademy.org/

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This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. –  Søren Holten Hansen Sep 15 '14 at 9:54

In C and similar languages:

x = 292;
xScaled = x / 500.0;
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