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Sorry, just attempting to do a past exam question in preparation for a Java exam and was hoping someone could tell me whether or not my solution is correct. The question :

Using Java enums, implement a class for payroll computation. The constants in the class correspond to the normal days of the week : Monday, Tuesday...Friday, weekend days : Saturday and Sunday and a Bank Holiday which is a special fay of the week.

The class should provide an instance method double pay ( double time, double payrate ) which returns the total pay of an employee who has worked on the current day. The rules for computation are as follows :

The pay for the given day given by

base pay = pay rate * hours worked.

Here, base pay is given by :

base pay = pay rate * hours worked

The overtime pay of that day is given by

overtime pay = pay rate * overtime hours/2

The overtime hours depend on the kind of day.

Normal weekday: For a normal weekday, overtime hours are the hours worked on that day in excess of 8 hours.

Weekend: For weekend days, the overtime hours are the hours worked on that day.

Bank holiday: For a bank holiday, the over time hours are 1.5 times the hours worked on that day.

Make sure your class is maintainable. It should be possible to add and remove without breaking existing code. Hint: implement your class with the strategy enum pattern.

public class Payroll {
   public enum Day {
      MONDAY, TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY,THURSDAY, FRIDAY, SATURDAY, SUNDAY, BANK HOLIDAY;
   }

   public double pay( double time, double payrate ) {
      if ( day
   }



}

I can't really figure out where to go with this next, would anyone be able to help me with this please?

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2 Answers 2

There is a hint asking for the strategy enum pattern. Here's a starting point:

 public enum Day {
    MONDAY(Type.NORMAL), TUESDAY(Type.NORMAL), WEDNESDAY(Type.NORMAL), 
    THURSDAY(Type.NORMAL), FRIDAY(Type.NORMAL), SATURDAY(Type.WEEKEND),
    SUNDAY(Type.WEEKEND), BANK_HOLIDAY(Type.BANK_HOLIDAY);

    private Type type;                         // <- the strategy
    private Day(Type type) {this.type=type;}

    public double pay(double time, double payRate) {
       // calculate the pay using the strategy: type.overtimePay(hours, payRate)
    }

    private enum Type {
      NORMAL {
         @Override
         double overtimePay(double hours, double payRate) {
            // TODO: implement
         }
      }
      // same for WEEKEND and BANK_HOLIDAY

      abstract double overtimePay(double hours, double payRate);
    }
 }

So now, if you want to calculate the pay, it should be possible with

 double pay = Day.MONDAY.pay(10.5, 16.50);

or with a convenient (yet to be implemented method):

 double pay = getDay(aDate).pay(10.5, 16.50);  // getDay returns a Day enum
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As suggest by Andreas_D, you should look at strategy enum pattern; see for example this article.

Here's some quickly hacked code:

public enum PayRoll {

    MONDAY {
        public double pay( double time, double payrate ) {
            if (time <= 8)
                return payrate * time;
            else
                return payrate * 8 + payrate * (time - 8) / 2;
        }
    },

    // implement TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY,THURSDAY, FRIDAY

    SATURDAY {
        public double pay( double time, double payrate ) {
            return payrate * time / 2;
        }
    },

    // implement SUNDAY

    BANK_HOLIDAY {
        public double pay( double time, double payrate ) {
            return payrate * 1.5 * time / 2;
        }
    };


    public abstract double pay(double time, double payrate);
}

With that in place, you can do things like:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    PayRoll christmasDay = PayRoll.BANK_HOLIDAY;
    System.out.println(christmasDay.pay(5, 3));
}
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