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I have a program to determine the largest contiguous sum in an array, but want to extend it to work with circular arrays. Is there an easier way to do that than doubling the single array and calling my function to find the largest sum over all n-length arrays in the 2n length array?

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what are your requirements? What is the range of integers (?) the array can contain? Can it contain negative elements? How many elements will the array contain at most? To me this screams Dynamic Programming and there's probably a DP algo whose runtime runs around anything else... –  SyntaxT3rr0r May 18 '11 at 16:11
    
@SyntaxT3rr0r, that's famous problem and if there is no negative number sum of all items is answer (my be there are some other answers) so I think there is no specific ambiguity, and @rach, what's wrong with doubling list? order is O(n) (space and time) and nothing changes, and I think it's not a big overhead. –  Saeed Amiri May 18 '11 at 16:23
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@Saeed: Asking for requirements is the very first thing that I always do... If the array can contain hundreds of millions of elements ranging from -2**63 to 2**63-1 than I can assure you the "regular" answer won't work as easily for it. Because you'll need to store the sum on more than one "long". And what if there's not enough memory to store intermediate results? It's nearly always a time/memory trade-off. The 0-1 knapsack is famous too. Yet there are constraints. Asking for requirements is 101. And an "integer" in computing is hardly an "integer" in math... etc. –  SyntaxT3rr0r May 18 '11 at 16:41
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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I assume you are using the O(n) algorithm that continues adding to the sum, keeping track of the maximum, only restarting if you sum to a negative number. The only thing you need to do to capture the case of circular arrays is to apply the same principle to the circular aspect. When you reach the end of the array in the original algorithm, keep looping around to the start until you go below the maximum or hit the beginning of the current range (I think this is impossible, though, because if the solution was the full array, we sould have seen this on the first pass), in which case you're done.

max_start=0; max_end =0; maxv = 0; sum 0;
for i in range(arr):
    sum+= arr[i];
    if sum<0:
       sum=0; max_start =i;
    if maxv<sum:
       maxv=sum; max_end = i;

#seocnd pass
for i in range(max_start):
    sum+= arr[i];
    if sum<0:
       break;
    if maxv<sum:
       maxv=sum;max_end = i;
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just saw one comment in careercup related to the same question and i think this wont work for arrays like {7, -6, 5}. –  Aditya Kumar Feb 20 '12 at 13:57
    
Not working for arrays like {10, -3, -4, 7, 6, 5, -4, -1} –  Kshitij Jain Oct 5 '13 at 7:49
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See the following link :

It solves a problem using Kadane Algorithem.

http://www.geeksforgeeks.org/maximum-contiguous-circular-sum/

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Upvoted. The accepted answer is just plain wrong. –  Márcio Paiva Jun 2 '13 at 4:27
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I think the solution by @spinning_plate is wrong. Ca you please test it for the given cases.

int arr[] = {-3, 6, 2, 1, 7, -8, 13, 0};

Your approach returns 21.

Actual solution can be start from 6th index(i.e. 13 value) .. and end to 4th index(i.e. 7 value). Since array is circular we can take continuous series from 6th index to 7th index and from 0th index to 4th index.

The actual answer for the above case is : 26

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Well, you don't have to actually double the array. You can just emulate it by indexing your existing array modulo n, or by just iterating over it twice. Depending on the size of your array and cache behavior, this should be at most a factor of two slower than the algorithm for the noncircular array.

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Correct code based on nikhil's idea: elements of the minimum sum sub-array cannot appear in the final wrapping-or-not maximum sum sub-array.

public int maxSum(int[] arr) {
    if (arr.length == 0) return 0;

    int sum = 0;
    int min = Integer.MAX_VALUE;
    int eix = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
        sum = sum + arr[i] < arr[i] ? sum + arr[i] : arr[i];
        if (sum < min) {
            min = sum;
            eix = i;
        }
    }
    int max = 0;
    sum = 0;
    for (int i = eix; i < arr.length + eix; i++) {
        int ix = i < arr.length ? i : i - arr.length;
        sum = sum + arr[ix] > arr[ix] ? sum + arr[ix] : arr[ix];
        max = max > sum ? max : sum;
    }

    return max;
}
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