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I'm writing a very simple transport simulation (please don't ask why I use this approach, it's not really the point of my question).

I have three threads running (although you could consider them as seperate programs). One as a client, one as a server, and one as a proxy.

The first is used as the client, and the main code for that is given here:

try {
    Proxy proxy = new Proxy(Proxy.Type.SOCKS, new InetSocketAddress(InetAddress.getLocalHost(), 4466));
    Socket socket = new Socket(proxy);
    InetSocketAddress socketAddress = new InetSocketAddress(InetAddress.getLocalHost(), 4456);
    socket.connect(socketAddress);

    // send data
    for (String straat : straten) {
        socket.getOutputStream().write(straat.getBytes());
    }

    socket.getOutputStream().flush();
    socket.getOutputStream().close();
    socket.close();

} catch (Exception e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}

The second is the server side, given here:

public void run() {
    try {
        ServerSocket ss = new ServerSocket(4456);
        Socket s = ss.accept();
        BufferedReader in = new BufferedReader(
                new InputStreamReader(s.getInputStream()));

        String incoming;
        while ((incoming = in.readLine()) != null) {
            panel.append(incoming + "\n");
        }

        panel.append("\n");
        s.getInputStream().close();
        s.close();
        ss.close();

    } catch (Exception ex) {
        ex.printStackTrace();
    }
}

And then there's the proxy-thread:

public void run() {
    try {
        ServerSocket ss = new ServerSocket(4466);
        Socket s = ss.accept();
        BufferedReader in = new BufferedReader(
                new InputStreamReader(s.getInputStream()));

        panel.append(verzenderId + "\n");

        String incoming;
        while ((incoming = in.readLine()) != null) {
            panel.append(incoming + "\n");
        }

        panel.append("\n");
        s.getInputStream().close();
        s.close();
        ss.close();

    } catch (Exception ex) {
        ex.printStackTrace();
    }
}

Somehow, this won't work. The message is sent directly to the server, and the proxy doesn't receive any socket request.

How can I make this work so that port 4466 becomes a proxy for the communication between the client-thread and the server-thread?

The goal is to make this socket between the client and the server to become an SSLSocket, so that the proxy can't read anything that goes over it. Therefore, setting up two sockets, one between the client and the proxy and one between the proxy and the server, is not the solution I'm looking for.

Thanks a lot in advance.

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Shouldn't the "proxy" implement SOCKS protocol for this to work? See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SOCKS –  Nikolai N Fetissov May 18 '11 at 16:35
    
Based on the code, one can't determin which server your client connects to. How do you know it connects directly to port 4465 and not to 4466 ? –  nos May 18 '11 at 16:50
    
Do you mean I should add some extra functionality to thread of the proxy? Because on the client side, I do write that it is a SOCKS-proxy (see first line) –  Aegonis May 18 '11 at 16:51
    
Well, if you want to communicate through a SOCKS proxy, you have to implement the SOCKS protocol in your proxy server thread. Although, just to check which port something connects to, you don't need to do that. –  nos May 18 '11 at 16:53
    
@nos: both are on the localhost (since it is the same application). The proxy is listening to port 4466, the server is listening to port 4456. In the client, I indicate that the connection should be between the client and port 4456, going over the proxy at port 4466. –  Aegonis May 18 '11 at 16:53
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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Found the answer myself, apparently I can use this method from the Java API.

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