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I'm using the Jersey Client library to run tests against a rest service running on jboss. I have https set up fine on the server (running on localhost), using a self signed cert.

However whenever I run my tests with the https url I get the following error:

com.sun.jersey.api.client.ClientHandlerException: javax.net.ssl.SSLHandshakeException: sun.security.validator.ValidatorException: PKIX path building failed: sun.security.provider.certpath.SunCertPathBuilderException: unable to find valid certification path to requested target
    at com.sun.jersey.client.urlconnection.URLConnectionClientHandler.handle(URLConnectionClientHandler.java:131)
    at com.sun.jersey.api.client.Client.handle(Client.java:629)
    at com.sun.jersey.oauth.client.OAuthClientFilter.handle(OAuthClientFilter.java:137)
    at com.sun.jersey.api.client.WebResource.handle(WebResource.java:601)
    at com.sun.jersey.api.client.WebResource.access$200(WebResource.java:74)
    at com.sun.jersey.api.client.WebResource$Builder.get(WebResource.java:459)
    at test.helper.Helper.sendSignedRequest(Helper.java:174)
    ... And so on

I know this is because my self signed cert is not in the java keystore. Is there any way I can make the Client not check the validity of the ssl cert and just use it regardless?

This code will only ever be run against test servers so I don't want to go to the hassle of adding new trusted certs each time we set up a new test server.

Here's the code which is making the call:

OAuthParameters params = new OAuthParameters();

// baseline OAuth parameters for access to resource
params.signatureMethod(props.getProperty("signature_method"));
params.consumerKey(props.getProperty("consumer_key"));
params.setToken(props.getProperty("token"));
params.setVersion("1.0");
params.nonce();

// OAuth secrets to access resource
OAuthSecrets secrets = new OAuthSecrets();
secrets.consumerSecret(props.getProperty("consumer_secret"));
secrets.setTokenSecret(props.getProperty("token_secret"));

// Jersey client to make REST calls to token services
Client client = Client.create();

// OAuth test server resource
WebResource resource = client.resource(props.getProperty("url"));

// if parameters and secrets remain static, filter cab be added to each web resource
OAuthClientFilter filter = new OAuthClientFilter(client.getProviders(), params, secrets);

// filter added at the web resource level
resource.addFilter(filter);
WebResource.Builder wbr = resource.getRequestBuilder().accept(props.getProperty("accept"));

return wbr.get(ClientResponse.class);

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

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4 Answers

up vote 18 down vote accepted

After some searching and trawling through some old stackoverflow questions I've found a solution in a previously asked SO question:

Here's the code that I ended up using.

// Create a trust manager that does not validate certificate chains
TrustManager[] trustAllCerts = new TrustManager[]{new X509TrustManager(){
    public X509Certificate[] getAcceptedIssuers(){return null;}
    public void checkClientTrusted(X509Certificate[] certs, String authType){}
    public void checkServerTrusted(X509Certificate[] certs, String authType){}
}};

// Install the all-trusting trust manager
try {
    SSLContext sc = SSLContext.getInstance("TLS");
    sc.init(null, trustAllCerts, new SecureRandom());
    HttpsURLConnection.setDefaultSSLSocketFactory(sc.getSocketFactory());
} catch (Exception e) {
    ;
}
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Chris, do you have a version that works with Java 7? In you code you did not provide a KeyStore at all, did you specify a keystore using SSL properties to the VM with -D? –  Uri Dec 19 '13 at 12:45
    
I did not specify a KeyStore. I used the above code without any other VM arguements. If I believe the code works because it doesn't check if its it is signed by a trusted signer, it only checks if it is well formed. –  Chris Salij Jan 24 at 19:05
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I had the same problem adn did not want this to be set globally, so I used the same TrustManager and SSLContext code as above, I just changed the Client to be created with special properties

 ClientConfig config = new DefaultClientConfig();
 config.getProperties().put(HTTPSProperties.PROPERTY_HTTPS_PROPERTIES, new HTTPSProperties(
     new HostnameVerifier() {
         @Override
         public boolean verify( String s, SSLSession sslSession ) {
             // whatever your matching policy states
         }
     }
 ));
 Client client = Client.create(config);
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This code doesn't compile: Cannot find symbol "sc". –  Vinicius Jul 8 '13 at 21:54
    
Removed arg, letting HTTPSProperites use this constructor jersey.java.net/nonav/apidocs/1.12/jersey/com/sun/jersey/client/… –  Ransom Briggs Jul 9 '13 at 14:00
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worked for me with this code. May be its for Java 1.7

    TrustManager[] trustAllCerts = new TrustManager[]{new X509TrustManager() {

        @Override
        public X509Certificate[] getAcceptedIssuers() {
            // TODO Auto-generated method stub
            return null;
        }

        @Override
        public void checkServerTrusted(X509Certificate[] arg0, String arg1)
                throws CertificateException {
            // TODO Auto-generated method stub

        }

        @Override
        public void checkClientTrusted(X509Certificate[] arg0, String arg1)
                throws CertificateException {
            // TODO Auto-generated method stub

        }
    }};

    // Install the all-trusting trust manager
    try {
        SSLContext sc = SSLContext.getInstance("TLS");
        sc.init(null, trustAllCerts, new SecureRandom());
        HttpsURLConnection.setDefaultSSLSocketFactory(sc.getSocketFactory());
    } catch (Exception e) {
        ;
    }
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This answer is identical to Chris Salij's answers except it's more verbose and was answered months later. –  Wolfgang Fahl Sep 25 '13 at 11:16
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This code will only ever be run against test servers so I don't want to go to the hassle of adding new trusted certs each time we set up a new test server.

This is the kind of code that will eventually find its way in production (if not from you, someone else who's reading this question will copy and paste the insecure trust managers that have been suggested into their applications). It's just so easy to forget to remove this sort of code when you have a deadline, since it doesn't show up as a problem.

If you're worried about having to add new certificates every time you have a test server, create your own little CA, issue all the certificates for the test servers using that CA and import this CA certificate into your client trust store. (Even if you don't deal with things like online certificate revocation in a local environment, this is certainly better than using a trust manager that lets anything through.)

There are tools to help you do this, for example TinyCA or XCA.

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