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I have the following tables:

Suppliers(Sno, Sname, Address)
Parts(Pno, Pname, Colour)
Catalogue(Sno, Pno, Price)

and I want to find the Sno of the suppliers who supply every part.

So far, I've written this:

SELECT s.sname
FROM suppliers s JOIN catalogue c
USING s.sno

Now how do I write the part "suppliers that supply every part"?

I was thinking about having the count(*) from parts = count(pno) for each supplier Sno. Could someone please give me a hint/write the first part of the equality?

Thanks!

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1  
I'd love to believe this is not homework. The supplier and parts database is a classic in textbooks (notably Chris Date's) and the supplier who supplies all parts is the classic relational division example. –  onedaywhen May 19 '11 at 9:36
    
If this is genuine, ask you business analyst whether they want division with or without remainders and what happens when the set of parts is empty (e.g. can all suppliers supply no parts?) If this is homework, tell you teacher to come up with a more original assignment :) –  onedaywhen May 19 '11 at 9:43
    
I have no problem with a teacher using examples from the past as long as the example teaches something. Probably most true for beginner classes. –  Marichyasana May 22 '13 at 8:23

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You're close. You need to add a group by/having clause with a subquery:

 group by s.sname having count(*) = (select count(*) from catalogue)
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SELECT s.sname
    FROM suppliers s 
        INNER JOIN catalogue c
            ON s.Sno = c.Sno
    GROUP BY s.sname
    HAVING COUNT(c.Pno) = (SELECT COUNT(Pno) FROM Parts)
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Off the top of my head, you could write

SELECT  s.Sno
  FROM  suppliers s
  WHERE NOT EXISTS (
     SELECT  p.Pno
       FROM  parts p
       WHERE NOT EXISTS (
         SELECT  c.*
           FROM  catalogue c
           WHERE c.Pno = P.Pno
             AND c.Sno = S.Sno
         )
     )

i.e. supplier where not exists (part that we don't supply), for a solution avoiding counts. No idea if this would be more or less efficient than the counts.

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SELECT s.Sno, s.Sname
FROM Suppliers s
  CROSS JOIN Parts p
  LEFT JOIN Catalogue c ON s.Sno = c.Sno AND p.Pno = c.Pno
GROUP BY s.Sno, s.Sname
HAVING COUNT(*) = COUNT(c.Pno)
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Try this:

alter proc clr
@c char(10),
@pno int output
as
    begin
        declare @f int
        if exists(select p# from p where colour=@c)
            begin
                select @pno=p# from p where colour=@c
                --set @f=1
            end
    --  else
    --      set @f=0
      --    return @f
end


--clr 'red',2

select p# from p where colour='red'



alter proc prcs
@c char(20)
as
    begin
        declare @pno numeric(2)
        declare @f int
        exec @f=clr @c,@pno output
        --if @f=1
        --  begin
                select @pno
                select s# from sp where p#=@pno
                --set @i=1
        --  end

            --set @i=0
    --return @i
end

prcs 'red'

select * from sp

select * from p,sp where p.p#=sp.p# and colour='red'


alter proc prcj  
@c char(10)
as
    begin
        declare @i int
        exec @i=prcs @c
        if @i=1
            begin
                print'list of supplier'
                select sname from s
                where s#=@c
        end
        else
            print'this record is not found'
    end
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2  
Welcome to Stack Overflow. While this may (or may not) answer the question, it would be better to add an explanation of what you are doing in addition to providing code. –  davidism Aug 16 '14 at 3:45

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