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I can't get to the bottom of this error, because when the debugger is attached, it does not seem to occur. Below is the code.

This is a WCF server in a Windows service. The method NotifySubscribers is called by the service whenever there is a data event (at random intervals, but not very often - about 800 times per day).

When a Windows Forms client subscribes, the subscriber ID is added to the subscribers dictionary, and when the client unsubscribes, it is deleted from the dictionary. The error happens when (or after) a client unsubscribes. It appears that the next time the NotifySubscribers() method is called, the foreach() loop fails with the error in the subject line. The method writes the error into the application log as shown in the code below. When a debugger is attached and a client unsubscribes, the code executes fine.

Do you see a problem with this code? Do I need to make the dictionary thread-safe?

[ServiceBehavior(InstanceContextMode=InstanceContextMode.Single)]
public class SubscriptionServer : ISubscriptionServer
{
    private static IDictionary<Guid, Subscriber> subscribers;

    public SubscriptionServer()
    {            
        subscribers = new Dictionary<Guid, Subscriber>();
    }

    public void NotifySubscribers(DataRecord sr)
    {
        foreach(Subscriber s in subscribers.Values)
        {
            try
            {
                s.Callback.SignalData(sr);
            }
            catch (Exception e)
            {
                DCS.WriteToApplicationLog(e.Message, 
                  System.Diagnostics.EventLogEntryType.Error);

                UnsubscribeEvent(s.ClientId);
            }
        }
    }


    public Guid SubscribeEvent(string clientDescription)
    {
        Subscriber subscriber = new Subscriber();
        subscriber.Callback = OperationContext.Current.
                GetCallbackChannel<IDCSCallback>();

        subscribers.Add(subscriber.ClientId, subscriber);

        return subscriber.ClientId;
    }


    public void UnsubscribeEvent(Guid clientId)
    {
        try
        {
            subscribers.Remove(clientId);
        }
        catch(Exception e)
        {
            System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine("Unsubscribe Error " + 
                    e.Message);
        }
    }
}
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9 Answers 9

up vote 588 down vote accepted

What's likely happening is that SignalData is indirectly changing the subscribers dictionary under the hood during the loop and leading to that message. You can verify this by changing

foreach(Subscriber s in subscribers.Values)

To

foreach(Subscriber s in subscribers.Values.ToList())

If I'm right, the problem will dissapear

share|improve this answer
6  
BTW .ToList() is present in System.Core dll which is not compatible with .NET 2.0 applications. So you might need to change your target app to .Net 3.5 –  mishal153 May 19 '10 at 9:25
1  
This is great. I did it with an ArrayList and it also worked perfectly (obviously with ToArray()) –  aleafonso Sep 19 '11 at 9:46
22  
I do not understand why you did a ToList and why that fixes everything –  CoffeeAddict Feb 29 '12 at 6:13
84  
@CoffeeAddict: The issue is that subscribers.Values is being modified inside the foreach loop. Calling subscribers.Values.ToList() copies the values of subscribers.Values to a separate list at the start of the foreach. Nothing else has access to this list (it doesn't even have a variable name!), so nothing can modify it inside the loop. –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Apr 20 '12 at 12:37
1  
That worked perfectly! –  equisde Oct 1 at 11:54

When a subscriber unsubscribes you are changing contents of the collection of Subscribers during enumeration.

There are several ways to fix this, one being changing the for loop to:

public void NotifySubscribers(DataRecord sr)  
{
    foreach(Subscriber s in subscribers.Values.ToList())
    {
...
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1  
+1, but Jared was faster. Thanks to both of you. –  cdonner Mar 3 '09 at 2:27
    
I see what you are saying about unsubscribing in the catch section - but this would only be a secondary error if something else caused the call-back to fail. I will look at this more closely. –  cdonner Mar 3 '09 at 13:27

A more efficient way, in my opinion, is to have another list that you declare that you put anything that is "to be removed" into. Then after you finish your main loop (without the .ToList()), you do another loop over the "to be removed" list, removing each entry as it happens. So in your class you add:

private List<Guid> toBeRemoved = new List<Guid>();

Then you change it to:

public void NotifySubscribers(DataRecord sr)
{
    toBeRemoved.Clear();

    ...your unchanged code skipped...

   foreach ( Guid clientId in toBeRemoved )
   {
        try
        {
            subscribers.Remove(clientId);
        }
        catch(Exception e)
        {
            System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine("Unsubscribe Error " + 
                e.Message);
        }
   }
}

...your unchanged code skipped...

public void UnsubscribeEvent(Guid clientId)
{
    toBeRemoved.Add( clientId );
}

This will not only solve your problem, it will prevent you from having to keep creating a list from your dictionary, which is expensive if there are a lot of subscribers in there. Assuming the list of subscribers to be removed on any given iteration is lower than the total number in the list, this should be faster. But of course feel free to profile it to be sure that's the case if there's any doubt in your specific usage situation.

share|improve this answer
    
yes, this makes sense. –  mishal153 May 19 '10 at 9:32

You can also lock your subscribers dictionary to prevent it from being modified whenever its being looped:

 lock (subscribers)
 {
         foreach (var subscriber in subscribers)
         {
               //do something
         }
 }
share|improve this answer
2  
+1 for citing a core multi-threaded programming technique –  Steven Magana-Zook Aug 14 '13 at 3:31
    
Is that a complete example? I have a class (_dictionary obj below) that contains a generic Dictionary<string,int> named MarkerFrequencies, but doing this didn't instantly solve the crash: lock (_dictionary.MarkerFrequencies) { foreach (KeyValuePair<string, int> pair in _dictionary.MarkerFrequencies) {...} } –  Jon Coombs Apr 21 at 5:25
1  
@JCoombs it's possible that you're modifying, possibly reassigning the MarkerFrequencies dictionary inside the lock itself, meaning that the original instance is no longer locked. Also try using a for instead of a foreach, See this and this. Let me know if that solves it. –  Mohammad Sepahvand Apr 21 at 6:09
    
Well, I finally got around to fixing this bug, and these tips were helpful--thanks! My dataset was small, and this operation was just a UI display update, so iterating over a copy seemed best. (I also experimented with using for instead of foreach after locking MarkerFrequencies in both threads. This prevented the crash but seemed to require further debugging work. And it introduced more complexity. My only reason for having two threads here is to enable the user to cancel an operation, by the way. The UI doesn't directly modify that data.) –  Jon Coombs Jul 22 at 19:45
1  
Problem is, for large applications, locks can be a major performance hit -- better off to use a collection in the System.Collections.Concurrent namespace. –  BrainSlugs83 Sep 8 at 4:39

I had the same issue, and it was solved when I used a "for" loop instead of foreach

            for (int i = 0; i < itemsToBeLast.Count; i++)
            //foreach (var item in itemsToBeLast)
            {
                var matchingItem = itemsToBeLast.FirstOrDefault(item => item.Detach);

               if (matchingItem != null)
               {
                  itemsToBeLast.Remove(matchingItem);
                  continue;
               }
               allItems.Add(itemsToBeLast[i]);// (attachDetachItem);
            }
share|improve this answer

Actually the problem seems to me that you are removing elements from the list and expecting to continue to read the list as if nothing had happened.

What you really need to do is to start from the end and back to the begining. Even if you remove elements from the list you will be able to continue reading it.

share|improve this answer
    
I dont see how that would make any difference? If you removing an element in the middle of the list it would still throw an error as the item it is trying to access cannot be found? –  Zapnologica Jul 17 at 5:48
1  
@Zapnologica the difference is -- you wouldn't be enumerating the list -- instead of doing a for/each, you'd be doing a for/next and accessing it by integer -- you can definitely modify a list a in a for/next loop, but never in a for/each loop (because for/each enumerates) -- you can also do it going forwards in a for/next, provided you have extra logic to adjust your counters, etc. –  BrainSlugs83 Sep 8 at 4:37

You can copy subscribers dictionary object to a same type of temporary dictionary object and then iterate the temporary dictionary object using foreach loop.

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So a different way to solve this problem would be instead of removing the elements create a new dictionary and only add the elements you didnt want to remove then replace the original dictionary with the new one. I don't think this is too much of an efficiency problem because it does not increase the number of times you iterate over the structure.

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I think the issue behind this error is, we can not make a change in the same dictionary object that we are looping through. But if we can iterate a dictionary using a temp list of its keys, in parallel we can modify it.

sample:

//get key collection from dictionary into a list to loop through
List<int> keys = new List<int>(Dictionary.Keys);

// iterating key collection using simple for-each loop
foreach (int key in keys)
{
  // Now we can perform any modification with values of dictionary.
  Dictionary[key] = Dictionary[key] - 1;
}

Blog Post about it: Resolved: Collection was modified; enumeration operation may not execute.

Why this error occurs: Answer

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