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If I need to call 3 http API in sequential order, what would be a better alternatives of the following codes

http.get({ host: 'www.example.com', path: '/api_1.php' }, function(res) { 
  res.on('data', function(d) { 

    http.get({ host: 'www.example.com', path: '/api_2.php' }, function(res) { 
      res.on('data', function(d) { 

        http.get({ host: 'www.example.com', path: '/api_3.php' }, function(res) { 
          res.on('data', function(d) { 


          });
        });
        }
      });
    });
    }
  });
});
}
share|improve this question
    
other than cleaning that up, i don't think you can do better than that. –  hvgotcodes May 18 '11 at 17:22
1  
Why do they need to be in order? –  Raynos May 18 '11 at 17:23
3  
@Raynos You might need some data from api_1 before you know what to send to api_2 –  andyortlieb Oct 11 '12 at 19:14
    
helpful answer: stackoverflow.com/a/16846761/303896 –  alxndr Nov 2 '13 at 4:11
3  
It's worth mentioning that Futures is pretty deprecated, consider using a newer library like Bluebird or Q. –  Benjamin Gruenbaum May 26 '14 at 14:42

10 Answers 10

up vote 29 down vote accepted

Using deferreds like Futures.

var sequence = Futures.sequence();

sequence
  .then(function(next) {
     http.get({}, next);
  })
  .then(function(next, res) {
     res.on("data", next);
  })
  .then(function(next, d) {
     http.get({}, next);
  })
  .then(function(next, res) {
    ...
  })

If you need to pass scope along then just do something like this

  .then(function(next, d) {
    http.get({}, function(res) {
      next(res, d);
    });
  })
  .then(function(next, res, d) { })
    ...
  })
share|improve this answer
    
Please try IcedCoffeScript to which provides await and defer for nodejs. –  Thanigainathan Jul 25 '14 at 22:21
    
i dont use coffescript why would i use icedcoffescript –  Muhammad Umer Sep 19 '14 at 14:40
    
Is this non blocking? I mean it is blocking for the next function in line but this won't block execution of other async functions, will it? –  Oktav Oct 3 '14 at 14:23
    
Yes, deferred methods are non-blocking / async. –  dvlsg Nov 12 '14 at 18:22

I like Raynos' solution as well, but I prefer a different flow control library.

https://github.com/caolan/async

Depending on whether you need the results in each subsequent function, I'd either use series, parallel, or waterfall.

Series when they have to be serially executed, but you don't necessarily need the results in each subsequent function call.

Parallel if they can be executed in parallel, you don't need the results from each during each parallel function, and you need a callback when all have completed.

Waterfall if you want to morph the results in each function and pass to the next

endpoints = 
 [{ host: 'www.example.com', path: '/api_1.php' },
  { host: 'www.example.com', path: '/api_2.php' },
  { host: 'www.example.com', path: '/api_3.php' }];

async.mapSeries(endpoints, http.get, function(results){
    // Array of results
});
share|improve this answer
    
What is http here? When I run this code I get http is not defined!!! –  McSas Nov 14 '13 at 14:22
4  
var http = require('http'); –  Dan Mundy Nov 19 '13 at 20:00
    
Hah. example.com is actually a domain designed for this sort of thing. Wow. –  meawoppl Mar 2 '14 at 22:50
    
The async.series code doesn't work, at least as of async v0.2.10. series() only takes up to two arguments and will execute the first argument's elements as functions, so async throws an error trying to execute the objects as functions. –  lid Apr 13 '14 at 20:03
    
You can do something similar to what is intended with this code using forEachAsync (github.com/FuturesJS/forEachAsync). –  lid Apr 13 '14 at 20:44

I'd use a recursive function with a list of apis

var APIs = [ '/api_1.php', '/api_2.php', '/api_3.php' ];
var host = 'www.example.com';

function callAPIs ( host, APIs ) {
  var API = APIs.shift();
  http.get({ host: host, path: API }, function(res) { 
    var body = '';
    res.on('data', function (d) {
      body += d; 
    });
    res.on('end', function () {
      if( APIs.length ) {
        callAPIs ( host, APIs );
      }
    });
  });
}

callAPIs( host, APIs );

edit: request version

var request = require('request');
var APIs = [ '/api_1.php', '/api_2.php', '/api_3.php' ];
var host = 'www.example.com';
var APIs = APIs.map(function (api) {
  return 'http://' + host + api;
});

function callAPIs ( host, APIs ) {
  var API = APIs.shift();
  request(API, function(err, res, body) { 
    if( APIs.length ) {
      callAPIs ( host, APIs );
    }
  });
}

callAPIs( host, APIs );

edit: request/async version

var request = require('request');
var async = require('async');
var APIs = [ '/api_1.php', '/api_2.php', '/api_3.php' ];
var host = 'www.example.com';
var APIs = APIs.map(function (api) {
  return 'http://' + host + api;
});

async.eachSeries(function (API, cb) {
  request(API, function (err, res, body) {
    cb(err);
  });
}, function (err) {
  //called when all done, or error occurs
});
share|improve this answer
    
This is the method I employed as I have a variable list of requests to make (600 items and growing). That said, there is a problem with your code: the 'data' event will be emitted multiple times per request if the API output is greater than the chunk size. You want to "buffer" the data like so: var body = ''; res.on('data',function(data){ body += data; }).on('end',function(){ callback(body); if (APIs.length) callAPIs(host, APIs);}); –  Ankit Aggarwal May 27 '12 at 17:19
    
Updated. I was just wanting to show how the problem could be make simpler/more flexible through recursion. Personally I always use the request module for this sort of thing since it lets you skip the multiple callbacks with ease. –  generalhenry May 27 '12 at 18:59
    
@generalhenry, how would i do this if i wanted to use the request module? Can you offer a code snippet that achieves the above using request? –  Scotty Apr 25 '13 at 10:54
    
I added a request version and a request/async version. –  generalhenry Apr 25 '13 at 15:13

You could do this using my Common Node library:

function get(url) {
  return new (require('httpclient').HttpClient)({
    method: 'GET',
      url: url
    }).finish().body.read().decodeToString();
}

var a = get('www.example.com/api_1.php'), 
    b = get('www.example.com/api_2.php'),
    c = get('www.example.com/api_3.php');
share|improve this answer
4  
Works great, why no love I wonder. Async nazis be damned. –  naturalethic Aug 24 '12 at 20:28

It seems solutions for this problem is never-ending, here's one more :)

// do it once.
sync(fs, 'readFile')

// now use it anywhere in both sync or async ways.
var data = fs.readFile(__filename, 'utf8')

http://alexeypetrushin.github.com/synchronize

share|improve this answer
    
Though the library you linked DOES offer a solution to the OP's problem, in your example, fs.readFile is always sync. –  Eric Feb 20 '14 at 16:26
1  
Nope, you can supply callback explicitly and use it as asynchronous version if you wish. –  Alexey Petrushin Feb 27 '14 at 10:51
    
the example was for http requests though, not file system communication. –  Seth Jan 25 at 8:54

Using the request library can help minimize the cruft:

var request = require('request')

request({ uri: 'http://api.com/1' }, function(err, response, body){
    // use body
    request({ uri: 'http://api.com/2' }, function(err, response, body){
        // use body
        request({ uri: 'http://api.com/3' }, function(err, response, body){
            // use body
        })
    })
})

But for maximum awesomeness you should try some control-flow library like Step - it will also allow you to parallelize requests, assuming that it's acceptable:

var request = require('request')
var Step    = require('step')

// request returns body as 3rd argument
// we have to move it so it works with Step :(
request.getBody = function(o, cb){
    request(o, function(err, resp, body){
        cb(err, body)
    })
}

Step(
    function getData(){
        request.getBody({ uri: 'http://api.com/?method=1' }, this.parallel())
        request.getBody({ uri: 'http://api.com/?method=2' }, this.parallel())
        request.getBody({ uri: 'http://api.com/?method=3' }, this.parallel())
    },
    function doStuff(err, r1, r2, r3){
        console.log(r1,r2,r3)
    }
)
share|improve this answer

Another possibility is to set up a callback that tracks completed tasks:

function onApiResults(requestId, response, results) {
    requestsCompleted |= requestId;

    switch(requestId) {
        case REQUEST_API1:
            ...
            [Call API2]
            break;
        case REQUEST_API2:
            ...
            [Call API3]
            break;
        case REQUEST_API3:
            ...
            break;
    }

    if(requestId == requestsNeeded)
        response.end();
}

Then simply assign an ID to each and you can set up your requirements for which tasks must be completed before closing the connection.

const var REQUEST_API1 = 0x01;
const var REQUEST_API2 = 0x02;
const var REQUEST_API3 = 0x03;
const var requestsNeeded = REQUEST_API1 | REQUEST_API2 | REQUEST_API3;

Okay, it's not pretty. It is just another way to make sequential calls. It's unfortunate that NodeJS does not provide the most basic synchronous calls. But I understand what the lure is to asynchronicity.

share|improve this answer

use sequenty.

sudo npm install sequenty

or

https://github.com/AndyShin/sequenty

very simple.

var sequenty = require('sequenty'); 

function f1(cb) // cb: callback by sequenty
{
  console.log("I'm f1");
  cb(); // please call this after finshed
}

function f2(cb)
{
  console.log("I'm f2");
  cb();
}

sequenty.run([f1, f2]);

also you can use a loop like this:

var f = [];
var queries = [ "select .. blah blah", "update blah blah", ...];

for (var i = 0; i < queries.length; i++)
{
  f[i] = function(cb, funcIndex) // sequenty gives you cb and funcIndex
  {
    db.query(queries[funcIndex], function(err, info)
    {
       cb(); // must be called
    });
  }
}

sequenty.run(f); // fire!
share|improve this answer

There are lots of control flow libraries -- I like conseq (... because I wrote it.) Also, on('data') can fire several times, so use a REST wrapper library like restler.

Seq()
  .seq(function () {
    rest.get('http://www.example.com/api_1.php').on('complete', this.next);
  })
  .seq(function (d1) {
    this.d1 = d1;
    rest.get('http://www.example.com/api_2.php').on('complete', this.next);
  })
  .seq(function (d2) {
    this.d2 = d2;
    rest.get('http://www.example.com/api_3.php').on('complete', this.next);
  })
  .seq(function (d3) {
    // use this.d1, this.d2, d3
  })
share|improve this answer

Here's my version of @andy-shin sequently with arguments in array instead of index:

function run(funcs, args) {
    var i = 0;
    var recursive = function() {
        funcs[i](function() {
            i++;
            if (i < funcs.length)
                recursive();
        }, args[i]);
    };
    recursive();
}
share|improve this answer

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