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I'm learning Haskell, and I'm trying to add preconditions to a (trivial, as an exercise) element_at function (code below). I've created a "helper" elem_at_r because otherwise, len x fails at some point (when x is a 'literal' rather than a list? - I still have trouble parsing ghci's error messages). elem_at now has all the error checking, and elem_at_r does the work. In elem_at, I'd like to add a check that x is indeed a list (and not a 'literal'). How can I do that?

len x = sum [ 1 | a <- x]

elem_at_r x n | n == 0     = head x
              | 0 < n      = elem_at_r (tail x) (n-1)

elem_at x n | x == []    = error "Need non-empty list"
            | len x <= n = error "n too large " ++ show (len x)
            | n < 0      = error "Need positive n"
            | otherwise  = elem_at_r x n  

Thanks!

Frank

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7  
Wait, wat? The type system will make sure it's a list. len :: [a] -> a so x must be [a], i.e. a list. If it isn't, that's a compiletime error. And unlike some much-despised functions, len won't throw an error for any list - why would it?. Please specify "len x fails". –  delnan May 18 '11 at 17:23
    
Could you please paste the error message you cannot parse? I could help you deciphering it. That you get an error message when you pass something else than a list is expected - The error message probably just tells you that GHCi can't figure out how the input can be a list. –  FUZxxl May 18 '11 at 18:05
    
And BTW, all your error-conditions are special cases of the second one. –  FUZxxl May 18 '11 at 18:06
    
The error message was ghci complaining with me calling elem_at with 3 and 3: elem_at 3 3. Now I understand, the type system is catching that the first '3' is not a list. If I had been compiling, the compiler would have stopped me, right? –  Frank May 18 '11 at 18:42
    
yes -- that is correct. –  Tim Perry May 18 '11 at 18:58

2 Answers 2

It looks like you were getting errors because of the "x == []" line. The code below pattern matches for that condition and adds a few signatures. Otherwise it is the same. Hope it helps.

len x = sum [ 1 | a <- x]

elem_at_r :: [a] -> Int -> a
elem_at_r x n | n == 0     = head x
              | 0 < n      = elem_at_r (tail x) (n-1)

elem_at :: [a] -> Int -> a
elem_at [] _ = error "Need non-empty list"
elem_at x n | len x <= n = error ("n too large " ++ show (len x))
            | n < 0      = error "Need positive n"
            | otherwise  = elem_at_r x n 

You could also make your helper functions part of this function using a where clause:

elem_at :: [a] -> Int -> a
elem_at [] _ = error "Need non-empty list"
elem_at x n | len x <= n = error ("n too large " ++ show (len x))
            | n < 0      = error "Need positive n"
            | otherwise  = elem_at_r x n 
  where
    len :: [a] -> Int 
    len x = sum [ 1 | a <- x]

    elem_at_r :: [a] -> Int -> a
    elem_at_r x n | n == 0     = head x
                  | 0 < n      = elem_at_r (tail x) (n-1)
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Just an extra question: adding type signatures is nice for documentation, but it works without, and I like concise code. Can I dispense with writing those type signatures? –  Frank May 18 '11 at 17:34
    
Thanks for the speedy replies! Greatly helps! –  Frank May 18 '11 at 17:35
    
One more thing, I can't pattern match [] _ right after a |, right? - IMHO, it would be cuter. –  Frank May 18 '11 at 17:36
    
You know, I don't know about that pattern match. You might consult Real World Haskell or Learn You a Haskell for Great Good. –  Tim Perry May 18 '11 at 17:37
1  
@Frank: Sorry, nope. It's basically function_name [pattern_matches] | boolean_predicate = expression. However, if the predicates don't handle all cases, it will fall through to the next pattern match, so you can still use guards to select which matches you want, in a way. –  C. A. McCann May 18 '11 at 17:53

Due to Haskell's type system, elem_at can only take a list as its first argument (x); if you try to pass a non-list, GHC will detect this and give an error at compile time (or interpretation time in GHCi). I don't know why len would "fail"; could you post the error message that GHCi gives you?

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More specifically, it's an example of Type Inference –  Zach L May 18 '11 at 17:24
    
Please bear with me, I'm a beginner at Haskell :-) "Fail" was probably not the right word. Here is the original code and the ghci error message I'm seeing: elem_at x n | x == [] = error "Need non-empty list" | len x <= n = error "n too large " ++ show (len x) | n < 0 = error "Need positive n" | n == 0 = head x | 0 < n = elem_at (tail x) (n-1) –  Frank May 18 '11 at 17:31
1  
:-) - got it. I thought I could dispense with types to make the code more concise but I see everybody is telling me they are useful :-) –  Frank May 18 '11 at 17:44
3  
Many times I put in signatures if I can't understand the errors ghci / ghc gives me. Once I fix the errors, I can (but usually don't) do away with the signatures. One advantage of removing the signatures is that ghc can sometimes make the function general enough that it works for more types than you envisioned. For example, if the signature of elem_at was "elem_at [Int] -> Int" and you remove it, the function magically works on all lists, not just Int's. –  Tim Perry May 18 '11 at 17:46
2  
@Frank: Think of the type signatures as telling GHC what you're expecting something to be. That way, if you're wrong, it will tell you what expectation was violated, instead of just trying its best to find something that works and then complaining wherever it gets stuck. –  C. A. McCann May 18 '11 at 17:50

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